SF Bay Area Nanotechnology Council

IEEE

Archive for the ‘Past Events’ Category

High-yield growth of aligned carbon nanotubes for applied energy applications

Thursday, July 8th, 2021

Eric Meshot, Staff Scientist, Lawrence Livermore Nat’l Lab

Tues July 20 – Agenda (California Time)
11:30 AM – Check-in & Nano Journal Club:
                            Carbon Nanotubes and Related Nanomaterials – Come prepared to discuss!
12:00 PM – Announcements and Speaker Introduction
12:10 – 1:30 PM –  Seminar and Q&A

Cost: Free, but registration is required. Register: Here
     Registered attendees will receive an email with a link for the Zoom meeting

  Advanced applications of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) “forests” require synthesis processes that minimizes nanotube diameter while maximizing number density across substrate areas exceeding centimeter scale. To address this need, we synthesized SWCNT forests on full silicon wafers with notable reproducibility and uniformity, and co-optimized growth for small diameters and high densities across large areas to access new territory in this 3D parameter space. We mapped the spatial uniformity of key structural features using Raman microscopy, X-ray scattering, and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Mass conversion rates from gas-phase hydrocarbon precursors to solid SWCNT product were high and remarkably invariant for different nano-catalyst compositions and densities, far exceeding typical lab-scale, benchtop reactors. Routine and robust manufacture of these high-quality materials at a practical scale unlocked a portfolio of high-performance applications, including energy storage devices, electronic gas sensors, optical metamaterials, twist-spun fibers, and 3D-printed composites.

Read More:
     High-yield growth kinetics and spatial mapping of single-walled carbon nanotube forests at wafer scale
     Quantifying the Hierarchical Order in Self-Aligned Carbon Nanotubes from Atomic to Micrometer Scale

 Dr. Eric Meshot (meh-SHOHT) is a staff scientist and principal investigator (PI) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate. He leads interdisciplinary teams geared toward connecting synthesis, structure, and performance in nanostructured carbon materials for a range of applications. Before joining LLNL in 2013, he was awarded a postdoctoral fellowship through the Belgian American Educational Foundation (BAEF) to investigate carbon nanostructures in electronics at imec in Leuven, Belgium. He holds the B.S. degree in engineering physics from the University of California at Berkeley (Go Bears!). He earned M.S.E degrees in both materials science and engineering and mechanical engineering before obtaining the Ph.D. degree in mechanical engineering in 2012 – all from the University of Michigan (Go Blue!). In his spare time, he enjoys playing basketball, chess, snowboarding, biking with his family, and relaxing at the beach.

Rapid SARS-CoV-2 Spike Protein Detection by Carbon Nanotube Based Near-Infrared Nanosensors

Tuesday, May 25th, 2021

Professor Markita Landry, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering,  UC Berkeley

Thurs June 17 – Agenda (California Time)
1:30 PM – Check-in & Nano Journal Club:
Diagnostics for SARS-CoV-2 Infections – Come prepared to discuss!
     2:00 PM – Announcements and Speaker Introduction
     2:10 PM – 3:00 PM : Seminar
Cost: Free, but registration is required

Register on Eventbrite: Here
     Registered attendees will receive an email with a link for the Zoom meeting

     The global SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus pandemic has led to a surging demand for rapid and efficient viral infection diagnostic tests, generating a supply shortage in diagnostic test consumables including nucleic acid extraction kits. Here, we develop a modular method for high-yield extraction of viral single-stranded nucleic acids by using ‘capture’ ssDNA sequences attached to carbon nanotubes. Target SARS-CoV-2 viral RNA can be captured by ssDNAnanotube constructs via hybridization and separated from the liquid phase in a single-tube system with minimal chemical reagents, for downstream quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) detection. This nanotube-based extraction method enables 100% extraction yield of target SARS-CoV-2 RNA from phosphate buffered saline in comparison to ~20% extraction yield when instead using a commercial silica-column kit.
     Notably, carbon nanotubes enable extraction of nucleic acids directly from 50% human saliva, bypassing the need for further biofluid purification and avoiding the use of DNA/RNA extraction kits. Carbon nanotube-based extraction of viral nucleic acids facilitates high-yield and high-sensitivity identification of viral nucleic acids such as the SARS-CoV-2 viral genome with reduced reliance on reagents affected by supply chain obstacles.
     We additionally discuss a carbon nanotube-based near-IR nanosensor for detection of active SARS-CoV-2 infections, in which the presence of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein elicits a robust, two-fold near-IR nanosensor fluorescence increase within 90 min of spike protein exposure. We characterize the nanosensor stability and sensing mechanism and passivate the nanosensor to preserve sensing response in saliva and viral transport medium. We further demonstrate that these ACE2-SWCNT nanosensors retain near-IR detection capacity in a surface-immobilized format, exhibiting a 73% fluorescence turn-on response within 5 s of exposure to 35 mg/L SARS-CoV-2 virus-like particles. Taken together, our efforts can help increase the sensitivity of existing qPCR-based tests and provide orthogonal methods of identifying active CoV2 infections.

Read More: Rapid SARS-CoV‑2 Spike Protein Detection by Carbon Nanotube-Based Near-Infrared Nanosensors

     

     Markita Landry is an assistant professor in the department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. She received a B.S. in Chemistry and a B.A. in Physics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a Ph.D. in Chemical Physics and a Certificate in Business Administration from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and completed an NSF postdoctoral fellowship in Chemical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
     Her current research centers on the development of synthetic nanoparticle-polymer conjugates for imaging neuromodulation in the brain, and for the delivery of genetic materials into plants. The Landry lab exploits the highly tunable chemical and physical properties of nanomaterials for the creation of bio-mimetic structures, molecular imaging, and plant genome editing. She is also on the scientific advisory board of Terramera and on the scientific advisory board of Chi-Botanic. She is a recent recipient of over 20 early career awards, including awards from the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, the DARPA Young Investigator program, the Beckman Young Investigator program, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the NSF CAREER award, is a Sloan Research Fellow, an FFAR New Innovator, and is a Chan Zuckerberg Biohub Investigator.


Would your company sponsor the Nanotechnology Council?
The investment required would be a very modest % of your marketing budget! Contact: Glenn Friedman

May 12 Nano Forum: ActiveCopper™ attacks Covid

Monday, May 3rd, 2021

Ultra-Active Antimicrobial Copper Surfaces, Self-Sterilizing in 30-60 sec: Engineered Copper at the Nanoscale

Dr. Alfred Zinn, Founder and CTO at Kuprion Inc.

Wed May 12 – Agenda (California Time)
11:30 AM – Check-in & Nano Journal Club:
A materials-science perspective on tackling COVID-19 – Come prepared to discuss!
     12:00 PM – Announcements and Speaker Introduction
     12:10 PM – 1:00 PM : Seminar
Cost: Free, but registration is required

Register on Eventbrite: Here
     Registered attendees will receive an email with a link for the Zoom meeting

     The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has created an acute worldwide demand for sustained broadband pathogen suppression in households, hospitals, and public spaces. The US recently passed a new sad milestone of 500,000 deaths due to COVID-19, the highest rate anywhere in the world. In response, we have created a rapid-acting, self-sterilizing copper material capable of killing SARS-CoV-2 and many other microbes in seconds. The highly active material destroys pathogens faster than any conventional copper configuration. The material maintains its antimicrobial efficacy over weeks and is shelf stable. We have performed rigorous testing in accordance with guidelines from U.S. governing authorities and believe that the material could offer broad spectrum, non-selective defense against most microbes via integration into masks and other protective equipment. The presentation will provide a detailed view into the “inner” workings of the material including the underlying mechanical details that make this high efficacy possible.

     

     Dr. Alfred Zinn is founder and CTO of Kuprion Inc., a materials company principally engaged in the manufacture and application of engineered copper materials for a wide variety of applications such as surface mount technology, packaging, printed circuit board assembly, printed electronics, 3D printing, injection molding and many thermal applications with special focus on copper-based nanomaterials. The latter are fused to bulk copper to take advantage of the low processing temperatures, and the high electrical and thermal conductivity of bulk copper. Since the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic, Dr. Zinn and the Kuprion team have been investigating ActiveCopper (aCu) as a powerful antimicrobial. aCu has been successfully tested against Gram-negative and positive bacteria, non/enveloped viruses including SARS-CoV-2, and multiple resistant strains of bacteria (“superbugs”). In all instances it kills pathogens in 1 minutes or less, which is an unprecedented level of efficacy for copper. With these extraordinary findings, Dr. Zinn has submitted the material for EPA registration for incorporation into PPE such as masks, gloves, and surface coatings.

Alfred received his Doctor of Science degree in Chemistry in 1990 from the Philipps University, Marburg, Germany. Prior to his current position, Dr. Zinn was a Lockheed Martin Fellow at the Advanced Technology Center (ATC) of the Lockheed Martin Space System Company, in Palo Alto, CA. He holds over 40 patents in materials, structures and processing technologies and THz technology. He has authored or coauthored over 30 archival journal publications, including book chapters in “The Chemistry of Metal CVD” as well as the “Encyclopedia of Inorganic Chemistry.” Over the past two decades, he has presented his technical results and accomplishments at many national and international Conferences.


Combating the COVID Pandemic in India: A Genomics Approach

Thursday, March 11th, 2021

Dr. Jyoti Yadav, Sr. Pr. Scientist at the Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology (IGIB), Delhi, INDIA

Dr. Jyoti Yadav is a Sr. Pr. Scientist at the Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology (IGIB) in Delhi. IGIB is a constituent laboratory of CSIR, Under Ministry of Science and Technology, India. Dr. Yadav is an alumnus of IIT Kanpur, had worked as a visiting Faculty in Japan’s Tohoku University and was a postdoctoral researcher at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, USA.

Wed March 24
     
5:30 PM: Registration & Nano Journal Club
     6:00 PM: Speaker Introduction and Announcement
     6:10 PM – 7:00 PM: Seminar
Cost: Free, but registration is required

Register on Eventbrite: Here
     Registered attendees will receive an email with a link for the Zoom meeting

New! Journal Club: During the registration period, Lincoln Bourne will lead a discussion of selected abstracts from the most recent Meta conference, Lisbon 2019.

Abstract

The beginning of 2020 was marked with stories of a mysterious virus overpowering all possible human efforts to combat it. In no time, it reached India, Delhi. Amongst all, scientists tirelessly looked for solutions to mitigate the problem. The solutions changed as time progressed, but the spirit never changed. Scientists at IGIB provided different solutions at different time points of the pandemic. How genomics contributed in combating the pandemic in India is the story I am going to talk about.


Announcement: Now forming a new IEEE Nanotechnology Technical Committee for the promotion of technological innovation and excellence in quantum, neuromorphic and unconventional computing. The purpose is to face societal challenges in these areas through participations in NTC conferences, publications and other outreach and education activities. Contact Giovanni Finocchio or Kerem Camsari

Nov 12th, 2020: Online Symposium on Quantum Computing: Devices, Challenges and Applications

Wednesday, October 21st, 2020

IEEE SFBA Nanotechnology Council presents a symposium on Zoom! Join us for this one-day virtual conference!

When: Thurs Nov 12 – 8:30 AM to 3:30 PM Pacific Time (9am start)
Cost:
$5 – with discounts available (Limited free tickets for Students and Unemployed/In-Transition/Retirees)

Online Event! Register HERE ! Registered attendees will receive an email with a link for the Zoom meeting

Quantum Computing: Devices, Challenges and Applications

The conference brings together leading researchers at the cutting edge of Quantum Computing technology from academia, government lab and industry. Topics covered will include various approaches to building quantum devices including superconducting Qbits (Google, IBM), adiabatic annealing (DWave\NASA Ames), and Quantum Photonic approaches such as defects in semiconductors and single atom Qubits using ultra cold atoms (Stanford\UC Berkeley).

Apart from discussions on different device approaches to harnessing information based on the interactions of light and electrons, the conference will also cover important computational challenges in this field. Topics covered will include designing effective quantum algorithms, quantum supremacy, scalability, quantum-inspire. We will strive to provide an effective forum for conference participants to network and actively engage with the speakers.

Our Lineup (for full abstracts and bios, click here!) :

Sept 15th, 2020: The Era of Hyperscaling in Electronics

Tuesday, September 1st, 2020

The Era of Hyperscaling in Electronics

Prof.  Suman Datta, Stinson Chair Professor of Nanotechnology, University of Notre Dame

Tues Sept 15, 11:30 AM – 1:30 PM : Online Check-in 11:30 AM – 12 Noon; Seminar 12 Noon – 1:30 PM

Online (Zoom) FREE Event! Register HERE

Abstract: 

Heterogeneous Integration Fabric

In the past five decades, the semiconductor industry has gone through two distinct eras of scaling: the geometric (or classical) scaling era and the equivalent (or effective) scaling era. As transistor and memory features approach sub-10 nanometer, it is apparent that room for further scaling in the horizontal plane is running out. Further, the rise of data abundant computing is exacerbating the interconnect bottleneck that exists in conventional computing architecture between the compute cores and the memory blocks. In this talk, I will discuss how electronics is poised to enter a new, third, era of scaling – hyperscaling – in which resources are added in a flexible way when needed to meet the demands of data abundant workloads. This era will be driven by advances in embedded non-volatile memories, hybrid devices with merged logic and memory functionalities, monolithic three-dimensional integration, and heterogeneous integration techniques.

Biography:

Suman Datta is the Stinson Chair Professor of Nanotechnology in Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Notre Dame. Prior to that, he was a Professor of Electrical Engineering at The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, from 2007 to 2011. From 1999 till 2007, he was in the Advanced Transistor Group at Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, where he developed several generations of high-performance logic transistor technologies including high-k/metal gate, Tri-gate and non-silicon channel CMOS transistors. His research group focuses on emerging devices that enable new computing models. He is a recipient of the Intel Achievement Award (2003), the Intel Logic Technology Quality Award (2002), the Penn State Engineering Alumni Association (PSEAS) Outstanding Research Award (2012), the SEMI Award for North America (2012), IEEE Device Research Conference Best Paper Award (2010, 2011) and the PSEAS Premier Research Award (2015).  He is a Fellow of IEEE and the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). He has published over 350 journal and refereed conference papers and holds 185 patents related to semiconductors. He is the Director of a multi-university advanced microelectronics research center, called the ASCENT, funded by the Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). He will serve as the General Chair of the 2020 IEEE International Electron Device Meeting (IEDM).

August 6th, 2020: All-Printed Supercapacitors for In Space Manufacturing and Terrestrial Applications

Tuesday, July 28th, 2020

All-Printed Supercapacitors for In Space Manufacturing and Terrestrial Applications

Dr. Myeonglok Seol, NASA Ames Research Center

Aug 6, 2020, 11:30 AM – 1:30 PM : Online Check-in 11:30 AM – 12 Noon; Seminar 12 Noon – 1:30 PM

Online (Zoom) FREE Event! Register  Here!

ABSTRACT

Printing technology has evolved from traditional quick writing tools to the modern
manufacturing methods for functional devices and systems. The benefits of printing-based
manufacturing include less material waste, fast-turn around prototyping due to simple
design customization and wide substrate compatibility. In this presentation, all-printed
supercapacitors, where all the components are made by printing, are introduced. Because
the device is manufactured only by printing, the complexity of manufacturing facilities can
be minimized and the resource efficiency and versatility are maximized, which are
particularly important in places where the supply of material and human resources are
limited such as rural areas, environmental monitoring of nuclear sites and space exploration
missions. We have fabricated electrical double layer capacitors and pseudocapacitors, both
with high electrochemical performance and cyclic durability and the results will be discussed
in detail.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY

myeonglok seol speaker headshot

Myeonglok Seol is currently a Scientist at the Center for Nanotechnology at NASA Ames
Research Center. He received his PhD in Electrical Engineering from Korea Advanced
Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) in 2016. His research focuses on energy
harvesting and storage devices, printed electronics, and nanotechnology-enabled devices.
He received Future Technology Leader Award from the Engineers’ Council in 2018 and the
2018 Mike Sargeant Career Achievement Award for Young Professionals from the Institute
of Engineering and Technology, IET (UK).

Relevant citations and links

M.-L. Seol et al., All-Printed In-Plane Supercapacitors by Sequential Additive Manufacturing Process, ACS Applied Energy Materials, 2020, 3, 4965-4973, https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acsaem.0c00510

[UPDATE – NOW VIRTUAL!] June 9th, 2020: Quantitative Plasmonic Sensing with Single-Chip Inkjet Dispense Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (ID-SERS)

Saturday, May 23rd, 2020

SFBA Nanotechnology Council is pleased to announce our first online seminar – and it’s free!

We’d also like to take a moment to appreciate our community – the Council has earned the 2019 IEEE Outstanding Chapter Santa Clara Valley, as well as the Nanotechnology Council Outstanding Chapter title worldwide. Please see the Awards page for details.  Thank you all for your support!

Now onto the talk!

——

Quantitative Plasmonic Sensing with Single-Chip Inkjet Dispense Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (ID-SERS)

Dr. Fausto D’Apuzzo, Optical Scientist, HP Labs

Tues June 9

Noon-1:30PM Pacific Time, Virtual Meeting via Zoom

Register Here ! (Note: FREE to attend, but limited to 100 attendees! Registration ends at 10AM Pacific Time June 2nd.)

drfaustoplasmonicsensing

ABSTRACT

In this talk, I will present our Laboratory work on highly-quantitative plasmonic sensing based on Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). I will first describe our nano-imprinted SERS substrate architecture and performance. Then I will show how inkjet dispensing can be used in conjunction with SERS to encode each sensor with a calibration pattern of microdroplets (~30 pico-liters), with the aim of locally calibrating sensor performance. This way, we demonstrate that Measurement Uncertainty of the SERS signal can be reduced below 2%, which to our knowledge, is a new record for plasmonic sensing platform. Furthermore, the use of inkjet dispensing in combination with Raman mapping improves assay throughput (100-fold) and reduces sample volume consumption (105-fold) in an automated and reproducible fashion. Since this approach overcomes important practical hurdles, we believe that this work reignites interest in the potential commercialization of plasmonic-based chemical sensors.

Recent paper for reference:  A Generalizable Single-Chip Calibration Method for Highly Quantitative SERS via Inkjet Dispense.

 

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY

drfaustoheadshot

Dr. Fausto D’Apuzzo is Optical Scientist at HP Labs, working on the Life Science team. His research interests are in optics systems, plasmonics and metamaterials for bio-sensing, with a focus on Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). He started investigating plasmonic systems since his master (2011) and PhD at the University of Rome “Sapienza”, before holding a postdoc position at L. Berkeley National Labs (LBNL) studying 2D plasmonic systems with Synchrotron Nano-Spectroscopy. He interned as an Optical Engineer at ACAMP (Alberta, Canada) before joining HP Labs (2018-present) where he is developing plasmonic sensing systems for quantitative chemical analysis.

February 5th, 2020: Light-based Rapid 3D Bioprinting for Precision Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

Wednesday, January 29th, 2020

For future events we are seeking suggestions for speakers and venues. We also welcome volunteers – please contact Vasuda Bhatia

3D Bioprinting and Nanoengineering Research at UC San Diego

Dr. Shaochen Chen – Chair of NanoEngineering and Professor of Bioengineering at UC San Diego

Register: Here

Wed Feb 5
11:30am: Networking & Pizza
Noon-1PM: Seminar
Cost: $4 to $6
Location: EAG Laboratories – 810 Kifer Road, Sunnyvale

In this talk, I will present our laboratory’s recent research efforts in rapid 3D bioprinting to create 3D tissue constructs using a variety of biomaterials and cells. These 3D biomaterials are functionalized with precise control of micro-architecture, mechanical (e.g. stiffness), chemical, and biological properties. Such functional biomaterials allow us to investigate cell-microenvironment interactions at nano- and micro-scales in response to integrated physical and chemical stimuli. From these fundamental studies we have been creating both in vitro and in vivo precision tissues for tissue regeneration, disease modeling, and drug discovery. To vascularize these engineered tissues, we have also developed a prevascularization technique by using the rapid 3D bioprinting method. Multiple cell types mimicking the native vascular cell composition were encapsulated directly into hydrogels with precisely controlled distribution.
As the Chair of the NanoEngineering Department, I will also discuss several cutting-edge research areas by our outstanding faculty.

For more information visit http://nanoengineering.ucsd.edu/

 

 

     Dr. Shaochen Chen is a Professor and Chair in the NanoEngineering Department and Professor in the Bioengineering Department at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). He is the founding co-director of the Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center at UCSD. Before joining UCSD, Dr. Chen had been a Professor and a Henderson Centennial Endowed Faculty Fellow in Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin from 2001 to 2010. Between 2008 and 2010, he served as the Program Director for the Nanomanufacturing Program of the National Science Foundation (NSF). Dr. Chen’s primary research interests include: 3D printing and bioprinting, biomaterials and nanomaterials, stem cell and regenerative medicine, tissue engineering. He has published over 140 papers in top journals. Among his numerous awards, Dr. Chen received the NSF CAREER award, ONR Young Investigator award, and NIH Edward Nagy New Investigator Award. He also received the Milton C. Shaw Manufacturing Research Medal from ASME for his seminal work in 3D printing, bioprinting, and nanomanufacturing. Dr. Chen is a Fellow of AAAS, AIMBE, ASME, SPIE, and ISNM.

 

Dec 10th, 2019: Championing Science – Communicating Your Ideas to Decision Makers

Monday, November 11th, 2019

Championing Science – Communicating Your Ideas to Decision Makers

Dr. Roger Aines, Chief Scientist of the Energy Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Amy Aines, Founder and CEO of Damianakes Communications

Register: Here

Tues Dec 10
11:30am: Networking & Pizza
Noon-1PM: Seminar
Cost: $4 to $6
Location: EAG Laboratories – 810 Kifer Road, Sunnyvale

book cover

Innovation and breakthrough approaches that benefit humanity start with an idea. Your ability to advance your ideas depends in part on whether you can convince decision makers and cross-disciplinary team members to support the work. Yet communicating to non-expert funders, managers or colleagues is often where technologists fail.
Amy and Roger Aines reveal why, and what can be done to change the outcome. In this talk, they will share insights and strategies from their research for writing Championing Science – Communicating Your Ideas to Decision Makers. They will explain how engineers can leverage skills in research, observation, experimentation, and the influence process, to make sure their ideas are heard.

For more information visit www.championingscience.com


   For the past 15 years, Dr. Roger Aines has been building coalitions around the globe to develop climate and energy technologies for a more livable planet. He is the Chief Scientist of the Energy Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory where he leads a major Carbon Initiative to understand, develop, and implement technologies for the removal and reuse of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Since he joined the lab in 1984, Roger’s work has spanned nuclear waste disposal, environmental remediation, applying stochastic methods to inversion and data fusion, managing carbon emissions and sequestration monitoring and verification methods.   Roger graduated from Carleton College with his degree in chemistry and received his PhD in geochemistry from Cal Tech. He holds 24 patents and has authored more than 100 publications.
Roger is a sought after speaker who has delivered and endured countless scientific presentations. His guidance has enabled hundreds of fellow scientists to secure millions in research funding and gain broad support for their ideas. With Amy Aines he authored Championing Science – Communicating Your Ideas to Decision Makers, a comprehensive book to teach scientists essential communication, influence and relationship-building skills to advance their work.

     Amy Aines is founder and CEO of Damianakes Communications and co-author of Championing Science – Communicating Your Ideas to Decision Makers. A messaging strategist, speaker coach and reputation builder, Amy believes “Words Matter.” She honed her skills directing corporate and public policy communications for global telecommunications, technology and mobile phone companies for the first 20 years of her career.
Since she launched her consulting firm in 1999, Amy has helped hundreds of technical experts get audiences to listen and take action; building support for new ideas. Her work has contributed to the success of a multitude of products and programs at startups and global giants in the biotech, healthcare, telecommunications and technology sectors. These days she lectures, coaches and leads workshops to help grad students, postdocs and STEM career professionals learn to communicate with impact.