SF Bay Area Nanotechnology Council

IEEE

Merging Nanotechnology & Synthetic Biology toward Directed Evolution of Energy Materials by Elena A. Rozhkova, Argonne National Laborator

Date and time

Thu, October 27, 2022, 11:30 AM – 1:30 PM PDT

Registration: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/nanotechnology-synthetic-biology-directing-evolution-of-energy-materials-tickets-420103008407

About this event

The biological use of solar energy for synthesis of fuels from water and carbon dioxide inspires researchers and engineers in their efforts to replace exhaustible energy sources with renewable technologies.

Environmentally friendly schemes of photocatalytic energy conversion, known as artificial photosynthesis, along with inorganic materials, also use biological structures, such as molecules, enzymes, machineries of whole microorganisms capable of light-harvesting, water splitting, carbon dioxide and proton reduction.

In this talk, I will make an argument that merging nanotechnology, biotechnology and synthetic biology approaches allows for systemic manipulation at the nanoparticle-bio interface toward directed evolution of energy materials, novel environmentally friendly catalytic, “artificial life” systems and, ultimately, to circular economy.

For example, purple membranes isolated from Halobacteria cells or, more recently, obtained via cell-free synthetic biology approaches, were integrated with TiO2 nanoparticles to produce hydrogen or reduce carbon dioxide. These new functions are not typical of the host microorganism. On the other hand, interplay between plasmon resonance of photonic (Au, Ag) nanoparticles and natural mechanisms of the same light-sensitive membranes in engineered hollow hybrids, or “artificial cell”, resulted in ATP photosynthesis.

Dr. Rozhkova earned her Ph.D. in Chemistry at the Moscow State Institute for Fine Chemical Technology. She then worked in Japan as a postdoctoral fellow of Japan Society for Promotion of Science at Tohoku University. After moving to the US in 2003, she became a research staff member at the Chemistry Department of Princeton University, and later she moved to Chicago.

Since joining the Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne National Laboratory in 2007, Elena has focused on a general theme of nano-bio interfaces, one of the most exciting interdisciplinary research fields of our time. Success in this area can lead to the solution of emerging problems of civilization, for example, to provide alternative sustainable energy, to advance medical technologies in the diagnosis and treatment of incurable diseases


Nanomaterial-Enabled Soft Electronics by Prof Yong Zhu, Andrew A. Adams Distinguished Professor North Carolina State University (NCSU)

Date and time

Thu, October 13, 2022, 11:30 AM – 1:30 PM PDT

Registration: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sfba-nanotechnology-seminar-nanomaterial-enabled-soft-electronics-tickets-420099277247

About this event

Soft electronics takes a leap beyond Si-based rigid electronics. They are made of ultrathin, compliant, and stretchable materials, already with broad applications from personal health monitoring to prosthetics to human-machine interfaces. Metal nanowires, in particular silver nanowire (AgNWs), have emerged as a promising soft electronic material.

In this talk, I will discuss the recent advances in AgNW-based soft electronics and soft robotics. I will start with highly conductive and stretchable AgNW electrodes, followed with a variety of wearable sensors for monitoring of human physiology and motions (e.g., strain, pressure, temperature, hydration, ECG, and EMG). I will discuss their application in personal healthcare and sports.

Manufacturing is a critical enabling step for developing AgNW-based soft electronic devices. I will discuss our recent efforts in scalable and sustainable nanomanufacturing.

Soft robotics have recently received tremendous interests. I will briefly discuss the AgNW-based soft heater and bimorph actuator and their application in soft robotics. I highlight a recent strategy employing mechanical bistability to significantly increase the speed of the thermally actuated soft robots.

Yong Zhu is the Andrew Adams Distinguished Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, with affiliate appointments in Biomedical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering, at North Carolina State University.
He received his BS degree from the University of Science and Technology of China and MS and PhD degrees from Northwestern University. After completing his postdoctoral training at the University of Texas at Austin he joined NC State University in 2007 as an Assistant Professor.
His group conducts research at the intersection of mechanics of materials and micro/nano-technology, including nanomaterial-enabled flexible, stretchable and wearable electronics.
His work has been recognized with numerous awards including James R. Rice Medal from the Society of Engineering Science, Bessel Research Prize from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, ASME Gustus L. Larson Memorial Award, and Best Wearable Material/Component Development Award at IDTechEx Wearable USA

CEO/Founders discuss the technology and business aspects of building a successful company based on nanotechnology

Cost: Free, but registration is required. Register: Here
Registered attendees will receive an email with a link for the Zoom meeting

Thurs April 16 –
Agenda (California Time)

3:30 PM – Check-in
4:00 – Welcome
4:15 – Lightning presentations by company founders
5:25 – Panel discussion – Glenn Friedman, moderator 

About this event

Speaker : Corie Ralson, PhD, Facility Director, Biological Nanostructures Facility at The Molecular Foundry and Guest Scientist in Molecular Biophysics & Integrated Bioimaging

The use of X-ray footprinting mass spectrometry (XFMS) to investigate structural features and conformational changes of macromolecules in the solution state has grown substantially in the past decade and has been successfully applied to systems ranging from single domain proteins to in vivo ribonucleoprotein assemblies. The method is highly complementary to the more widely used structural elucidation techniques for biological macromolecules such as x-ray diffraction, HDX, and cryo-electron microscopy. XFMS is an in situ hydroxyl radical (•OH) labeling method; X-ray irradiation dissociates solvent water to produce hydroxyl radicals, which covalently modify side chains which are solvent accessible. More specifically, residues which are in proximity to water molecules (either bulk or bound) are modified to a greater extent than residues which are not in proximity to water. Because liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry is then used to analyze the stable covalent modifications produced, the data provide a “water map” at the single residue level, which is then used to determine sample conformation. In this talk, I will describe the XFMS method, its advantages and disadvantages relative to other methods, recent technological advances in the method, and some recent exciting examples of structural information obtained on protein systems using the method.

Biological Macromolecules' structure; XFMS investigation image

Corie Ralston holds a B.S. in Physics from the University of California at Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in Biophysics from the University of California at Davis. She completed a post-doctoral fellowship at Brookhaven National Laboratory during which she helped develop the method of X-ray footprinting as a structural investigation technique for proteins and nucleic acids. In addition to being the Facility Director of of the Biological Nanostructures facility at the Molecular Foundry, she holds a guest appointment in the Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging division at Berkeley Lab, and is actively developing the method of X-ray footprinting at the Advanced Light Source synchrotron.



 Dr. Cat Graves,Principal Research Scientist at Hewlett Packard Labs
Cost: Free, but registration is required. Register: Here
     Registered attendees will receive an email with a link for the Zoom meeting

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Wed April 20 – Agenda (California Time)
11:30 AM – Check-in
12:00 PM – Announcements and Speaker Introduction
12:10 – 1:30 PM –  Seminar and Q&A
 
           
Abstract: 
The dramatic rise of data-intensive workloads has revived special-purpose hardware for continuing gains in computing performance. Several promising special-purpose approaches take inspiration from the brain, which outperforms digital computing in power and performance in key tasks such as pattern matching. One brain-inspired architecture called “in-memory computing” significantly reduces data movement and has been shown to improve performance in CMOS ASIC demonstrations. However, these approaches still suffer from low power efficiency. Emerging non-volatile memories are a highly attractive alternative for low-power and high-performance in these architectures. Originally developed as digital (binary) non-volatile memories, many of these devices have a highly tunable analog resistances which are well-matched to in-memory computing architectures. I will review our team’s recent work using crossbar and content addressable memory (CAMs) circuits to accelerate important computing workloads in machine learning, complex pattern matching and optimization. I will also discuss our team’s recently invented analog CAM circuit targeted to accelerate interpretable machine learning models. Our work spans co-design from circuits and devices to algorithms and architectures to enable low power, high-throughput computation for important computing workloads.

                        
 Dr. Cat Graves is a Principal Research Scientist at Hewlett Packard Labs developing analog and neuromorphic computational accelerators which leverage emerging devices such as resistive RAM (RRAM) for high energy efficiency and throughput compared to general-purpose digital approaches in data-centric domains. Some of her previous work utilized multilevel analog resistive RAM devices to natively perform matrix multiplication within crossbars, accelerating a core computation of wide-ranging applications from neural networks to signal processing. Currently, she leads a research team exploring uses of RRAM-based and analog associative memory circuits for accelerating diverse computational models, including tree-based ML models and finite automata processing for network security and genomics applications. Cat was awarded Silicon Valley Intellectual Property Law Association (SVIPLA) Inventor of the Year in 2021 for her co-invention of analog content addressable memories. Cat received her Ph.D. in Applied Physics from Stanford University studying ultrafast magnetism for future magnetic memory technologies while an NSF Graduate Research Fellow. She has published over 35 peer-reviewed papers, three book chapters, and has been awarded 14 US patents.

Prof. Jayakumar Rajadas, Director of the Regenerative Biomaterials Lab at Stanford

Cost: Free, but registration is required. Register: Here
     Registered attendees will receive an email with a link for the Zoom meeting

Thurs Feb 24 – Agenda (California Time)
11:30 AM – Check-in & Nano Journal Club:
     Review of Oxygenation with Nanobubbles: Possible Treatment for Hypoxic COVID-19 Patients
     Come prepared to discuss!
12:00 PM – Announcements and Speaker Introduction
12:10 – 1:30 PM –  Seminar and Q&A
 
From the early days of this pandemic until now, the reality of still no medication being readily available which can guarantee therapeutic and potentially lifesaving efficacy in all of the stages and diverse pathological manifestations of this novel coronavirus has inflicted drastic consequences upon the world. We have developed two drugs in vitro showing great promise for the successful treatment of acute, moderate and severe COVID-19 as well as persisting immune-mediated consequences with respect to advanced pharmacokinetics. The objectives of our approach and the underlying mechanisms are manifold, strategically aimed at preventing viral replication, concomitantly reducing the inflammation caused by this devastating and highly infectious disease and improving the antibody response to vaccines. Additionally, we also developed a partially repurposed nano technology to improve oxygen saturation in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) as a result of COVID-19.

Professor Jayakumar Rajadas is the author of 237 peer reviewed publications, has developed 82 patents, discovered the therapeutic effects of Disulfiram and Azlocillin for the treatment of persistent Lyme disease and is currently researching and developing solutions for COVID-19. Other projects of his focus use biophysical approaches such as AFM, fluorescence, and NMR to work on the molecular mechanisms of protein-initiated neurodegenerative disorders involved in the pathology of Alzheimer’s and Lyme disease. Furthermore, he is also known for his development of a unique and successful implantable biomaterials commercially available all over the world . He is the founding director of the ADDReB Laboratory of Cardiovascular Institute at Stanford School of Medicine. He is a trained chemist with a Ph.D. in Biophysical Chemistry from the Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai , India.


Agenda

9:10 am – 10:00 amBiomimetic Nanoparticles for the Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Liangfang Zhang, PhD
10: 10 am – 11:00 amAn overview of AI-enabled multi-scale simulations for targeting SARS-CoV-2; Dr. Arvind Ramanathan
11: 10 am – 12:00 pm  Corona Phase Molecular Recognition of SARS-CoV-2 and Associated Biomarkers; Professor Michael Strano
1:00 pm – 1:50 pmKey to successful development of mRNA manufacturing and lipids based RNA delivery; Erica Weiskircher-Hildebrandt
2:00 pm – 2:50 pmBiology-Powered Transistors: A merger of bio and nanotechnology; Francie Barron, PhD
3:00 pm – 3:50 pmNanotraps for the containment and clearance of SARS-CoV-2; Dr. Jun Huang

Registration : Free

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/ieee-sfba-nanotechnology-fall-symposium-tickets-207476125677

The worldwide outbreak of COVID-19 in now well into its second year.

Nanotechnology is in the forefront of combating COVID.Lipid nanoparticles are essential components of mRNA vaccines. Nanomaterials are enabling improved detection techniques, and novel therapies.

At this symposium academic and industrial researchers will present pathbreaking nanotechnology-based work focused on addressing the threat of COVID-19.

Topics will include nanotechnology to manufacture COVID mRNA vaccines, create novel nanomaterial decoy therapies, enhance molecular detection of viruses, and simulate nanostructured COVID proteins. The event will provide opportunities for attendees to network and actively engage with the speakers.

                 


About this event

Agenda:

11:30 AM – 12 Noon: Nano Journal Club*

12 Noon – 12:10 PM : Introduction and Announcements

12:10 Pm – 1:00 PM : Seminar by Jagjit Nada

*Nano Journal will discuss the paper on : Challenges for and Pathways toward Li-Metal-Based All-Solid-State Batteries

Seminar Talk: Probing Nanoscale Interface and Interphases in Lithium-ion Batteries

Electrochemical energy storage (EES) is one of the key drivers for next generation mobility, consumer electronics, defense technology, and other applications. EES is also an enabler to improve penetration of renewable energies such as solar and wind into the electric grid. To meet such demands there is an increasing need for batteries to have high energy density and power without compromising on safety and affordability. Electrode-electrolyte interfaces are central to battery performance and life as the ion must travel across the device without interruption between heterogenous materials interfaces. Most liquid and solid electrolytes have limited thermodynamic stability and form a reactive interphase layer that can usually range from a few nanometers to tens of nanometer The nature and composition of such reactive interphase layer primarily determines the quality of the ion-transport at the interface. The talk will focus on investigation of solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) on lithium-ion anodes such as silicon that is critical for the cycle and calendar life. The second part of the talk will cover solid-state batteries, where role of the solid electrolyte-electrode interfaces is critical for maintaining capacity and high-rate capability. Several important class of solid-electrolyte and their stability with Li-metal and cathodes will be presented.

Acknowledgement

This work was supported by the US Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy through the Vehicle Technology Office


		Probing Nanoscale Interface and Interphases in Lithium-ion  Batteries image

Jagjit Nanda is a Distinguished Staff Scientist and Group Leader of the Energy Storage and Conversion Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Chemical Sciences Division with 18 plus years of experience in energy storage and battery materials. He also has a joint faculty appointment in the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Prior to joining Oak Ridge in 2009, Jagjit worked as a Technical Lead at the Research and Advanced Engineering Center, Ford Motor Company, MI, leading R&D projects in lithium-ion battery materials and nanomaterials for energy application. He is the co-editor of Hand Book of Solid-State Batteries-2015 along with Nancy Dudney and Willam West and has co-authored more than 150 journal and technical publications in the topic of batteries, solid-state electrolytes and electrochemical interfaces. Jagjit is a Fellow of Electrochemical Society and winner of two R&D 100 awards in the area of batteries and supercapacitors.


Eric Meshot, Staff Scientist, Lawrence Livermore Nat’l Lab

Tues July 20 – Agenda (California Time)
11:30 AM – Check-in & Nano Journal Club:
                            Carbon Nanotubes and Related Nanomaterials – Come prepared to discuss!
12:00 PM – Announcements and Speaker Introduction
12:10 – 1:30 PM –  Seminar and Q&A

Cost: Free, but registration is required. Register: Here
     Registered attendees will receive an email with a link for the Zoom meeting

  Advanced applications of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) “forests” require synthesis processes that minimizes nanotube diameter while maximizing number density across substrate areas exceeding centimeter scale. To address this need, we synthesized SWCNT forests on full silicon wafers with notable reproducibility and uniformity, and co-optimized growth for small diameters and high densities across large areas to access new territory in this 3D parameter space. We mapped the spatial uniformity of key structural features using Raman microscopy, X-ray scattering, and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Mass conversion rates from gas-phase hydrocarbon precursors to solid SWCNT product were high and remarkably invariant for different nano-catalyst compositions and densities, far exceeding typical lab-scale, benchtop reactors. Routine and robust manufacture of these high-quality materials at a practical scale unlocked a portfolio of high-performance applications, including energy storage devices, electronic gas sensors, optical metamaterials, twist-spun fibers, and 3D-printed composites.

Read More:
     High-yield growth kinetics and spatial mapping of single-walled carbon nanotube forests at wafer scale
     Quantifying the Hierarchical Order in Self-Aligned Carbon Nanotubes from Atomic to Micrometer Scale

 Dr. Eric Meshot (meh-SHOHT) is a staff scientist and principal investigator (PI) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate. He leads interdisciplinary teams geared toward connecting synthesis, structure, and performance in nanostructured carbon materials for a range of applications. Before joining LLNL in 2013, he was awarded a postdoctoral fellowship through the Belgian American Educational Foundation (BAEF) to investigate carbon nanostructures in electronics at imec in Leuven, Belgium. He holds the B.S. degree in engineering physics from the University of California at Berkeley (Go Bears!). He earned M.S.E degrees in both materials science and engineering and mechanical engineering before obtaining the Ph.D. degree in mechanical engineering in 2012 – all from the University of Michigan (Go Blue!). In his spare time, he enjoys playing basketball, chess, snowboarding, biking with his family, and relaxing at the beach.


Professor Markita Landry, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering,  UC Berkeley

Thurs June 17 – Agenda (California Time)
1:30 PM – Check-in & Nano Journal Club:
Diagnostics for SARS-CoV-2 Infections – Come prepared to discuss!
     2:00 PM – Announcements and Speaker Introduction
     2:10 PM – 3:00 PM : Seminar
Cost: Free, but registration is required

Register on Eventbrite: Here
     Registered attendees will receive an email with a link for the Zoom meeting

     The global SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus pandemic has led to a surging demand for rapid and efficient viral infection diagnostic tests, generating a supply shortage in diagnostic test consumables including nucleic acid extraction kits. Here, we develop a modular method for high-yield extraction of viral single-stranded nucleic acids by using ‘capture’ ssDNA sequences attached to carbon nanotubes. Target SARS-CoV-2 viral RNA can be captured by ssDNAnanotube constructs via hybridization and separated from the liquid phase in a single-tube system with minimal chemical reagents, for downstream quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) detection. This nanotube-based extraction method enables 100% extraction yield of target SARS-CoV-2 RNA from phosphate buffered saline in comparison to ~20% extraction yield when instead using a commercial silica-column kit.
     Notably, carbon nanotubes enable extraction of nucleic acids directly from 50% human saliva, bypassing the need for further biofluid purification and avoiding the use of DNA/RNA extraction kits. Carbon nanotube-based extraction of viral nucleic acids facilitates high-yield and high-sensitivity identification of viral nucleic acids such as the SARS-CoV-2 viral genome with reduced reliance on reagents affected by supply chain obstacles.
     We additionally discuss a carbon nanotube-based near-IR nanosensor for detection of active SARS-CoV-2 infections, in which the presence of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein elicits a robust, two-fold near-IR nanosensor fluorescence increase within 90 min of spike protein exposure. We characterize the nanosensor stability and sensing mechanism and passivate the nanosensor to preserve sensing response in saliva and viral transport medium. We further demonstrate that these ACE2-SWCNT nanosensors retain near-IR detection capacity in a surface-immobilized format, exhibiting a 73% fluorescence turn-on response within 5 s of exposure to 35 mg/L SARS-CoV-2 virus-like particles. Taken together, our efforts can help increase the sensitivity of existing qPCR-based tests and provide orthogonal methods of identifying active CoV2 infections.

Read More: Rapid SARS-CoV‑2 Spike Protein Detection by Carbon Nanotube-Based Near-Infrared Nanosensors

     

     Markita Landry is an assistant professor in the department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. She received a B.S. in Chemistry and a B.A. in Physics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a Ph.D. in Chemical Physics and a Certificate in Business Administration from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and completed an NSF postdoctoral fellowship in Chemical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
     Her current research centers on the development of synthetic nanoparticle-polymer conjugates for imaging neuromodulation in the brain, and for the delivery of genetic materials into plants. The Landry lab exploits the highly tunable chemical and physical properties of nanomaterials for the creation of bio-mimetic structures, molecular imaging, and plant genome editing. She is also on the scientific advisory board of Terramera and on the scientific advisory board of Chi-Botanic. She is a recent recipient of over 20 early career awards, including awards from the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, the DARPA Young Investigator program, the Beckman Young Investigator program, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the NSF CAREER award, is a Sloan Research Fellow, an FFAR New Innovator, and is a Chan Zuckerberg Biohub Investigator.


Would your company sponsor the Nanotechnology Council?
The investment required would be a very modest % of your marketing budget! Contact: Glenn Friedman