SF Bay Area Nanotechnology Council

IEEE

Archive for the ‘Online’ Category

May 12 Nano Forum: ActiveCopper™ attacks Covid

Monday, May 3rd, 2021

Ultra-Active Antimicrobial Copper Surfaces, Self-Sterilizing in 30-60 sec: Engineered Copper at the Nanoscale

Dr. Alfred Zinn, Founder and CTO at Kuprion Inc.

Wed May 12 – Agenda (California Time)
11:30 AM – Check-in & Nano Journal Club:
A materials-science perspective on tackling COVID-19 – Come prepared to discuss!
     12:00 PM – Announcements and Speaker Introduction
     12:10 PM – 1:00 PM : Seminar
Cost: Free, but registration is required

Register on Eventbrite: Here
     Registered attendees will receive an email with a link for the Zoom meeting

     The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has created an acute worldwide demand for sustained broadband pathogen suppression in households, hospitals, and public spaces. The US recently passed a new sad milestone of 500,000 deaths due to COVID-19, the highest rate anywhere in the world. In response, we have created a rapid-acting, self-sterilizing copper material capable of killing SARS-CoV-2 and many other microbes in seconds. The highly active material destroys pathogens faster than any conventional copper configuration. The material maintains its antimicrobial efficacy over weeks and is shelf stable. We have performed rigorous testing in accordance with guidelines from U.S. governing authorities and believe that the material could offer broad spectrum, non-selective defense against most microbes via integration into masks and other protective equipment. The presentation will provide a detailed view into the “inner” workings of the material including the underlying mechanical details that make this high efficacy possible.

     

     Dr. Alfred Zinn is founder and CTO of Kuprion Inc., a materials company principally engaged in the manufacture and application of engineered copper materials for a wide variety of applications such as surface mount technology, packaging, printed circuit board assembly, printed electronics, 3D printing, injection molding and many thermal applications with special focus on copper-based nanomaterials. The latter are fused to bulk copper to take advantage of the low processing temperatures, and the high electrical and thermal conductivity of bulk copper. Since the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic, Dr. Zinn and the Kuprion team have been investigating ActiveCopper (aCu) as a powerful antimicrobial. aCu has been successfully tested against Gram-negative and positive bacteria, non/enveloped viruses including SARS-CoV-2, and multiple resistant strains of bacteria (“superbugs”). In all instances it kills pathogens in 1 minutes or less, which is an unprecedented level of efficacy for copper. With these extraordinary findings, Dr. Zinn has submitted the material for EPA registration for incorporation into PPE such as masks, gloves, and surface coatings.

Alfred received his Doctor of Science degree in Chemistry in 1990 from the Philipps University, Marburg, Germany. Prior to his current position, Dr. Zinn was a Lockheed Martin Fellow at the Advanced Technology Center (ATC) of the Lockheed Martin Space System Company, in Palo Alto, CA. He holds over 40 patents in materials, structures and processing technologies and THz technology. He has authored or coauthored over 30 archival journal publications, including book chapters in “The Chemistry of Metal CVD” as well as the “Encyclopedia of Inorganic Chemistry.” Over the past two decades, he has presented his technical results and accomplishments at many national and international Conferences.


Origin Stories – Exploring Entrepreneurship

Thursday, April 15th, 2021

Details

Our most popular event series: Several CEO/Founders discuss the technology and business aspects of building a successful company based on nanotechnology. Cost: Free!

Registration: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/origin-stories-exploring-entrepreneurship-tickets-148108094297

Wednesday, April 21, 2021
3:30 PM to 7:00 PM PDT

Zoom Meeting

Agenda (California Time)

3:30 – 4:00 pm – Check-in & Nano Journal Club**

4:00 – 4:15 pm – Welcome

4:15 – 5:20 pm – Lightning Presentations by Company Founders

5:25 – 6:45 pm – Panel Discussion – Glenn Friedman, moderator

Nano Journal Club: During the check-in period, Lincoln Bourne will lead a discussion of: Nanotechnology for Virus Treatment – a review paper that covers “Recent developments in antiviral nanotherapeutics and… a perspective on the application of nanotechnology to the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak and future virus pandemics”. The senior author, Liangfang Zhang, is one of the presenters for the main program.

Combating the COVID Pandemic in India: A Genomics Approach

Thursday, March 11th, 2021

Dr. Jyoti Yadav, Sr. Pr. Scientist at the Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology (IGIB), Delhi, INDIA

Dr. Jyoti Yadav is a Sr. Pr. Scientist at the Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology (IGIB) in Delhi. IGIB is a constituent laboratory of CSIR, Under Ministry of Science and Technology, India. Dr. Yadav is an alumnus of IIT Kanpur, had worked as a visiting Faculty in Japan’s Tohoku University and was a postdoctoral researcher at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, USA.

Wed March 24
     
5:30 PM: Registration & Nano Journal Club
     6:00 PM: Speaker Introduction and Announcement
     6:10 PM – 7:00 PM: Seminar
Cost: Free, but registration is required

Register on Eventbrite: Here
     Registered attendees will receive an email with a link for the Zoom meeting

New! Journal Club: During the registration period, Lincoln Bourne will lead a discussion of selected abstracts from the most recent Meta conference, Lisbon 2019.

Abstract

The beginning of 2020 was marked with stories of a mysterious virus overpowering all possible human efforts to combat it. In no time, it reached India, Delhi. Amongst all, scientists tirelessly looked for solutions to mitigate the problem. The solutions changed as time progressed, but the spirit never changed. Scientists at IGIB provided different solutions at different time points of the pandemic. How genomics contributed in combating the pandemic in India is the story I am going to talk about.


Announcement: Now forming a new IEEE Nanotechnology Technical Committee for the promotion of technological innovation and excellence in quantum, neuromorphic and unconventional computing. The purpose is to face societal challenges in these areas through participations in NTC conferences, publications and other outreach and education activities. Contact Giovanni Finocchio or Kerem Camsari

3D Interferometry and Nanomechanics – Electronics, Face Masks and More

Thursday, February 11th, 2021

Kurt Rubin, KLA Tencor

Tues Feb 16
     11:30 am – Sign-ins begin
     12:00 pm – Program starts
       1:30 pm – Event ends
Cost: Free, but registration is required

Register on Eventbrite: Here
     Registered attendees will receive an email with a link for the Zoom meeting

     3D optical profiling is a noncontact, high-resolution measurement and visualization technique used to measure the topography and geometry of devices and materials. Capabilities of commercial 3D interferometry systems have steadily improved; today, they can measure vertical nano- and microtopography spanning Ångstroms to many millimeters in length scale. True Color imaging, developed by KLA, provides additional understanding that is complimentary to topography. Advances in optomechanical hardware, optics, electronics, and software now make it possible to create economical precision 3D interferometric measurement systems, enabling 3D profiling to help a broader range of industrial and scientific applications.
     This talk provides an example of how the capabilities of this new generation of 3D optical measurements can be applied to the fields of printed and flexible electronics. Flexible electronics is characterized by a rich and diverse set of functions, device topographies, fabrication technologies, and various materials (conducting, insulating, dielectric, etc.), which have complex surface structures with diverse optical properties. Multiparameter printed arrays on flexible substrates can be used for sensing humidity, temperature, and mechanical strain, as well as for thermoelectric generators and many other purposes, all of which have performance dependencies upon geometry and fabrication process.
    Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) N95 filtering facepiece respirator (FFR) treatment is considered an effective decontamination approach to address the supply shortage of N95 FFRs during the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic. We investigated the nanomechanical and non-contact 3D optically-measured topographic properties of filtration fibers that have been exposed to different doses of UVC radiation. UVC exposure was shown to decrease both Young’s modulus (E), hardness (H) and fiber width, as measured on individual polypropylene (PP) fibers. Our results also show that the PP microfiber layer loses its strength when N95 respirators are exposed to an accumulated UVC dose during the process of decontamination, and the PP fiber width also exhibits a logarithmic decrease during UVC exposure. The nanoscale measurement results on individual fibers suggest that maximum cycles of UVC disinfection treatment should be limited due to excessive accumulated dose, which has the potential to decrease the fiber breaking strength.
     This talk will discuss examples of how optical and nanomechanical characterization can improve understanding of devices and materials, including the above topics, and more.

Read More:
     3D optical interferometry with True Color visualization advances understanding of flexible electronics
     Effect of Ultraviolet C Disinfection Treatment on the Nanomechanical and Topographic Properties of N95 Respirator Filtration Microfibers

               

     Kurt Rubin is an Applications Development Engineer at KLA Instruments where he focuses on advanced optical and electrical measurement and modeling. He has an extensive background in the invention of new optical, electrical and magnetic devices, materials and the development of new processes to fabricate them. He is an inventor of fundamental technology underlying multilayer optical storage and high-speed reversible memories. He holds 60 issued patents and degrees in physics and materials science from MIT, University of Washington and Stanford University.



TheIEEE Nanotechnology Council provides a forum for leading researchers and companies to discuss their work, along with networking opportunities for local scientists and engineers

In 2014, 2016, and again in 2019, the Nanotech Council was awarded Best Chapter for IEEE Region 6, out of of 200+ chapters in 12 states
In 2014, 2017, and again in 2019, the Council was awarded Nanotech Chapter of the Year by the IEEE Nanotech Council (worldwide)

Photos from past events posted: Here

Nov 12th, 2020: Online Symposium on Quantum Computing: Devices, Challenges and Applications

Wednesday, October 21st, 2020

IEEE SFBA Nanotechnology Council presents a symposium on Zoom! Join us for this one-day virtual conference!

When: Thurs Nov 12 – 8:30 AM to 3:30 PM Pacific Time (9am start)
Cost:
$5 – with discounts available (Limited free tickets for Students and Unemployed/In-Transition/Retirees)

Online Event! Register HERE ! Registered attendees will receive an email with a link for the Zoom meeting

Quantum Computing: Devices, Challenges and Applications

The conference brings together leading researchers at the cutting edge of Quantum Computing technology from academia, government lab and industry. Topics covered will include various approaches to building quantum devices including superconducting Qbits (Google, IBM), adiabatic annealing (DWave\NASA Ames), and Quantum Photonic approaches such as defects in semiconductors and single atom Qubits using ultra cold atoms (Stanford\UC Berkeley).

Apart from discussions on different device approaches to harnessing information based on the interactions of light and electrons, the conference will also cover important computational challenges in this field. Topics covered will include designing effective quantum algorithms, quantum supremacy, scalability, quantum-inspire. We will strive to provide an effective forum for conference participants to network and actively engage with the speakers.

Our Lineup (for full abstracts and bios, click here!) :

Sept 15th, 2020: The Era of Hyperscaling in Electronics

Tuesday, September 1st, 2020

The Era of Hyperscaling in Electronics

Prof.  Suman Datta, Stinson Chair Professor of Nanotechnology, University of Notre Dame

Tues Sept 15, 11:30 AM – 1:30 PM : Online Check-in 11:30 AM – 12 Noon; Seminar 12 Noon – 1:30 PM

Online (Zoom) FREE Event! Register HERE

Abstract: 

Heterogeneous Integration Fabric

In the past five decades, the semiconductor industry has gone through two distinct eras of scaling: the geometric (or classical) scaling era and the equivalent (or effective) scaling era. As transistor and memory features approach sub-10 nanometer, it is apparent that room for further scaling in the horizontal plane is running out. Further, the rise of data abundant computing is exacerbating the interconnect bottleneck that exists in conventional computing architecture between the compute cores and the memory blocks. In this talk, I will discuss how electronics is poised to enter a new, third, era of scaling – hyperscaling – in which resources are added in a flexible way when needed to meet the demands of data abundant workloads. This era will be driven by advances in embedded non-volatile memories, hybrid devices with merged logic and memory functionalities, monolithic three-dimensional integration, and heterogeneous integration techniques.

Biography:

Suman Datta is the Stinson Chair Professor of Nanotechnology in Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Notre Dame. Prior to that, he was a Professor of Electrical Engineering at The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, from 2007 to 2011. From 1999 till 2007, he was in the Advanced Transistor Group at Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, where he developed several generations of high-performance logic transistor technologies including high-k/metal gate, Tri-gate and non-silicon channel CMOS transistors. His research group focuses on emerging devices that enable new computing models. He is a recipient of the Intel Achievement Award (2003), the Intel Logic Technology Quality Award (2002), the Penn State Engineering Alumni Association (PSEAS) Outstanding Research Award (2012), the SEMI Award for North America (2012), IEEE Device Research Conference Best Paper Award (2010, 2011) and the PSEAS Premier Research Award (2015).  He is a Fellow of IEEE and the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). He has published over 350 journal and refereed conference papers and holds 185 patents related to semiconductors. He is the Director of a multi-university advanced microelectronics research center, called the ASCENT, funded by the Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). He will serve as the General Chair of the 2020 IEEE International Electron Device Meeting (IEDM).

August 6th, 2020: All-Printed Supercapacitors for In Space Manufacturing and Terrestrial Applications

Tuesday, July 28th, 2020

All-Printed Supercapacitors for In Space Manufacturing and Terrestrial Applications

Dr. Myeonglok Seol, NASA Ames Research Center

Aug 6, 2020, 11:30 AM – 1:30 PM : Online Check-in 11:30 AM – 12 Noon; Seminar 12 Noon – 1:30 PM

Online (Zoom) FREE Event! Register  Here!

ABSTRACT

Printing technology has evolved from traditional quick writing tools to the modern
manufacturing methods for functional devices and systems. The benefits of printing-based
manufacturing include less material waste, fast-turn around prototyping due to simple
design customization and wide substrate compatibility. In this presentation, all-printed
supercapacitors, where all the components are made by printing, are introduced. Because
the device is manufactured only by printing, the complexity of manufacturing facilities can
be minimized and the resource efficiency and versatility are maximized, which are
particularly important in places where the supply of material and human resources are
limited such as rural areas, environmental monitoring of nuclear sites and space exploration
missions. We have fabricated electrical double layer capacitors and pseudocapacitors, both
with high electrochemical performance and cyclic durability and the results will be discussed
in detail.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY

myeonglok seol speaker headshot

Myeonglok Seol is currently a Scientist at the Center for Nanotechnology at NASA Ames
Research Center. He received his PhD in Electrical Engineering from Korea Advanced
Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) in 2016. His research focuses on energy
harvesting and storage devices, printed electronics, and nanotechnology-enabled devices.
He received Future Technology Leader Award from the Engineers’ Council in 2018 and the
2018 Mike Sargeant Career Achievement Award for Young Professionals from the Institute
of Engineering and Technology, IET (UK).

Relevant citations and links

M.-L. Seol et al., All-Printed In-Plane Supercapacitors by Sequential Additive Manufacturing Process, ACS Applied Energy Materials, 2020, 3, 4965-4973, https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acsaem.0c00510

[UPDATE – NOW VIRTUAL!] June 9th, 2020: Quantitative Plasmonic Sensing with Single-Chip Inkjet Dispense Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (ID-SERS)

Saturday, May 23rd, 2020

SFBA Nanotechnology Council is pleased to announce our first online seminar – and it’s free!

We’d also like to take a moment to appreciate our community – the Council has earned the 2019 IEEE Outstanding Chapter Santa Clara Valley, as well as the Nanotechnology Council Outstanding Chapter title worldwide. Please see the Awards page for details.  Thank you all for your support!

Now onto the talk!

——

Quantitative Plasmonic Sensing with Single-Chip Inkjet Dispense Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (ID-SERS)

Dr. Fausto D’Apuzzo, Optical Scientist, HP Labs

Tues June 9

Noon-1:30PM Pacific Time, Virtual Meeting via Zoom

Register Here ! (Note: FREE to attend, but limited to 100 attendees! Registration ends at 10AM Pacific Time June 2nd.)

drfaustoplasmonicsensing

ABSTRACT

In this talk, I will present our Laboratory work on highly-quantitative plasmonic sensing based on Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). I will first describe our nano-imprinted SERS substrate architecture and performance. Then I will show how inkjet dispensing can be used in conjunction with SERS to encode each sensor with a calibration pattern of microdroplets (~30 pico-liters), with the aim of locally calibrating sensor performance. This way, we demonstrate that Measurement Uncertainty of the SERS signal can be reduced below 2%, which to our knowledge, is a new record for plasmonic sensing platform. Furthermore, the use of inkjet dispensing in combination with Raman mapping improves assay throughput (100-fold) and reduces sample volume consumption (105-fold) in an automated and reproducible fashion. Since this approach overcomes important practical hurdles, we believe that this work reignites interest in the potential commercialization of plasmonic-based chemical sensors.

Recent paper for reference:  A Generalizable Single-Chip Calibration Method for Highly Quantitative SERS via Inkjet Dispense.

 

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY

drfaustoheadshot

Dr. Fausto D’Apuzzo is Optical Scientist at HP Labs, working on the Life Science team. His research interests are in optics systems, plasmonics and metamaterials for bio-sensing, with a focus on Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). He started investigating plasmonic systems since his master (2011) and PhD at the University of Rome “Sapienza”, before holding a postdoc position at L. Berkeley National Labs (LBNL) studying 2D plasmonic systems with Synchrotron Nano-Spectroscopy. He interned as an Optical Engineer at ACAMP (Alberta, Canada) before joining HP Labs (2018-present) where he is developing plasmonic sensing systems for quantitative chemical analysis.