IEEE

Archive for the ‘Upcoming Meetings’ Category

Oct 8 – Lockheed’s Spy Satellite Programs

Thursday, February 13th, 2020

Rescheduled to:
Thursday, October 8, 2020

6:00 PM: Doors open for refreshments and networking
6:30 to 8:30 PM: Presentation and Q&A

Registration and donation prepayment requested
[click above]

Bring ticket to meeting

Venue:

KeyPoint Credit Union
2805 Bowers Ave (just off Central Expressway)
Santa Clara, CA 95051

Our Thanks To KeyPoint Credit Union

IEEE SV Tech History committee is extremely grateful to KeyPoint Credit Union for use of their auditorium as a venue.
Many thanks to Doron Noyman of KeyPoint for his support in making this happen.



Lockheed’s Spy Satellite Programs
Looking from above the Iron Curtain

ABSTRACT

CORONA, was America’s first eye-in-the-sky space mission replacing the U-2 flights ended by the shooting down of a flight in 1960.  Lockheed Missiles and Space Systems (Lockheed) here in Silicon Valley was the system integrator of the Corona payload which included new camera, film and recovery capsule as well as the developer of never flown Agena which served as the upper stage to the Thor booster and spacecraft.  It was breakthrough technology in all aspects.

The CORONA program depended on the development of a new spacecraft, Agena, designed and built by Lockheed.  Agena subsequently went on to support multiple other missions for many other customers, and essentially became America’s first space utility vehicle, with 362 launches over three decades.  Lockheed veterans will discuss the original CORONA mission and the key challenges Agena had to meet for long-term success.  They will illustrate how Agena subsystems and technologies coevolved and advanced together with system integration and test techniques, and how the program experiences taught the aerospace industry many fundamental lessons, including how to successfully specify and accommodate products from multiple suppliers.

SPEAKERS:

Sam Araki was one of the first team members on the CORONA Program as a system engineer for the Agena spacecraft and the three-axis stabilized spacecraft for the camera payload. At Lockheed for 38 years he retired in 1997 as the President of Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space Company. He is a Fellow of the American Astronautical Society and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He received the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics’ von Braun Award (2004) for Excellence in Space Program Management and the National Academy of Engineering’s Charles Stark Draper Prize (2005) for his contributions to the advancement of engineering. He was named a Pioneer of National Reconnaissance (2004) by the National Reconnaissance Office.

Miles Johnson a thirty two year Lockheed employee retired in 1994 as VP Engineering of the Lockheed Martin Space System Division (SSD). Upon graduation from The Ohio State University in 1961 Miles joined Lockheed at Vandenberg AFB as a Guidance & Control engineer on the Agena/Corona Program. He advanced to the position of Lockheed Launch Conductor and participated in 8+ launches before transitioning to Lockheed’s Silicon Valley facilities where he was responsible for Agena/Corona system engineering & integration. He held subsequent SSD Program management assignments of Manager Engineering Integration, Chief System Engineer, Program Manager and Vice President Special Programs.

Jim Carlock a 32 year employee of the Lockheed. He started his career in 1967 as a guidance and controls engineer on the Agena and other military programs. He was later involved in other space technology applications and became program manager for the Hubble Space Telescope, Ikonos commercial imager, and the Lockheed portion of the International Space station.

Terry Zaccone a thirty-one year Lockheed employee, retired in 2000. After graduating from UC Berkeley, he joined Lockheed and worked on was the Barnes Horizon Sensor for the Agena. He continued his studies while working, receiving his MA in Physics from San Jose State and his PhD in Psychoacoustics from Stanford in 1982. Dr. Zaccone worked on Strategic Defense Programs as Manager of Lockheed’s Optical Systems Department in their Palo Alto Research Labs,. He then joined the Astronautics Division as Chief Systems Engineer for the Ground Based Free Electron Laser Technology Integration Experiment (GBFEL-TIE).

Hugh Satterlee will discuss thermodynamics of Agena and subsequent spacecraft.

Bill Monroe an eight year Lockheed veteran spent the following eight years with Itek Corporation, the Corona camera manufacturer. He contributed to the thermal control design of both the Agena satellite and Corona payload. He has a BS, Mechanical Engineering from UC Berkeley and an MSME degree at Santa Clara University. His work with Itek cameras also gave him opportunities at the Lockheed Skunk Works in Burbank, where he worked with both the U-2 and SR-71 design teams.

Tom Gardner will moderate. He is our committee’s treasurer and webmaster. Tom has extensive experience in the computer storage industry.

Oct 10 – A Partial History of Makers in Silicon Valley

Monday, July 15th, 2019

Thursday, October 10, 2019
6:00 PM: Doors open for refreshments and networking
6:30 to 8:30 PM: Presentation and Q&A

Registration and donation prepayment requested
Click Here

 

Bring ticket to meeting

Venue:

KeyPoint Credit Union
2805 Bowers Ave (just off Central Expressway)
Santa Clara, CA 95051

Our Thanks To KeyPoint Credit Union

IEEE SV Tech History committee is extremely grateful to KeyPoint Credit Union for use of their auditorium as a venue.
Many thanks to Doron Noyman of KeyPoint for his support in making this happen.



Abstract:

Many people got interested in technology by taking things apart in order to learn how they work, and this was an important step in their learning how to build stuff themselves.  This event will feature important players in the history of the Maker/Hacker Community in Silicon Valley and beyond.  They will describe how various Maker communities started, and what their impact has been.  They will also offers insights into the trends that shaped the Maker movement, and will discuss why making is as important for our future as it was in our past.  It’s not just about tools and materials – it’s also about the people who learn to use them creatively.

Speakers:

Lee Felsenstein: CTO of Fonly LLC, and a Computer History Museum Fellow. One of the earliest engineers developing personal computers he took a countercultural route of exploration in finding development projects, leading to the realization that computers and terminals could be designed to “grow a computer club around itself” for support. In the process Lee helped set up the first public-access computer social media system, designed the first kit modem for hobbyists, and ran the meetings of the legendary Homebrew Computer Club. Calling himself “post-employable”, Lee takes on design contracts, speaks and writes about the relevance of personal computer history to today’s world

Dr. Andrew Cromarty: President and CEO of Heathkit. Dr. Cromarty has served as a corporate scientist and corporate marketer for several corporations, served on the Board of a corporate VC, and performed due diligence on over 60 opportunities for investments, mergers, and acquisitions.  At Heath Company, Dr. Cromarty has applied his corporate, startup and recovery skills to restore this century-old former $100 million manufacturing company from bankruptcy back to successful operations, developing and overseeing all manufacturing, staff development, product development, back-office and fulfillment operations, customer service, and marketing and sales. Heathkit now has shipped new products to thousands of customers worldwide under his leadership.

Doug Dougherty: CEO of Make Media is a leading advocate of the Maker Movement. He founded Make: Magazine in 2005, where the term “makers” was first used to describe people who enjoyed “hands-on” work and play.  Dale started the Maker Faire in the San Francisco Bay Area in 2006, and this has led to nearly 200 events in 40 countries, with over 1.5M attendees.  Both Make: and Maker Faire were catalysts of the Maker Movement.  Dale is President of Make: Community, and was a co-founder of O’Reilly Media where he was an editor of many early technical books.  While at O’Reilly, he developed GNN, the first commercial website, which launched in 1993 and was sold to AOL in 1995.  He coined the term “Web 2.0.”

Camp Peavy: Founder of the HBRC Challenge and HomeBrewed Robots.

Tom Coughlin, the moderator, is an officer of the IEEE Silicon Valley Tech History Committee, an At-Large Director of IEEE-CNSV and the IEEE-USA President.