Northern Canada AP/MTT Joint Chapter

IEEE
December 1st, 2022

IEEE NCS/AP-S/MTT-S Chapter

Dr. Anthony Grbic: Extreme Field Control with Electromagnetic Metasurfaces

Time: Thursday Dec. 1st, 2022 at 11:00 pm MDT

Location: University of Alberta – DICE 7-395 (Pizza served)

Join via this link: here

Anthony Grbic received the B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Toronto, Canada, in 1998, 2000, and 2005, respectively. In 2006, he joined the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA, where he is currently a Professor.
Anthony Grbic has made pioneering contributions to the theory and development of electromagnetic metamaterials and metasurfaces: finely textured, engineered electromagnetic structures/surfaces that offer unprecedented wavefront control. Dr. Grbic is a Fellow of the IEEE. He is currently an IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society Distinguished Microwave Lecturer (2022-2025). He is also serving on the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society (AP-S) Field Awards Committee and IEEE Fellow Selection Committee. From 2018 to 2021, he has served as a member of the Scientific Advisory Board, International Congress on Artificial Materials for Novel Wave Phenomena – Metamaterials.
. In addition, he has been Vice Chair of Technical Activities for the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society, Chapter IV (Trident), IEEE Southeastern Michigan Section, from Sept. 2007 – 2021. From July 2010 to July 2015, he was Associate Editor for the rapid publication journal IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters. Prof Grbic was Technical Program Co-Chair in 2012 and Topic Co-Chair in 2016 and 2017 for the IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and USNC-URSI National Radio Science Meeting. Dr. Grbic was the recipient of AFOSR Young Investigator Award as well as NSF Faculty Early Career Development Award in 2008, the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers in January 2010. He also received an Outstanding Young Engineer Award from the IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society, a Henry Russel Award from the University of Michigan, and a Booker Fellowship from the United States National Committee of the International Union of Radio Science in 2011. He was the inaugural recipient of the Ernest and Bettine Kuh Distinguished Faculty Scholar Award in the Department of Electrical and Computer Science, University of Michigan in 2012. In 2018, Prof. Anthony Grbic received a 2018 University of Michigan Faculty Recognition Award for outstanding achievement in scholarly research, excellence as a teacher, advisor and mentor, and distinguished service to the institution and profession. In 2021, he was selected as 1 of 5 finalists worldwide for the A.F. Harvey Engineering Research Prize, for his pioneering contributions to field of electromagnetic metamaterials. The A.F. Harvey Prize is the Institution of Engineering and Technology’s (IET’s) most valuable prize fund.

Abstract

The research area of metamaterials has captured the imagination of scientists and engineers over the past two decades by allowing unprecedented control of electromagnetic fields. The extreme manipulation of fields has been made possible by the fine spatial control and wide range of material properties that can be attained through subwavelength structuring. Research in this area has resulted in devices which overcome the diffraction limit, render objects invisible, and even break time reversal symmetry. It has also led to flattened and conformal optical systems and ultra-thin antennas. This seminar will identify recent advances in the growing area of metamaterials, with a focus on metasurfaces: two dimensional metamaterials. The talk will explain what they are, the promise they hold, and how these field-transforming surfaces are forcing the rethinking of electromagnetic/optical design.

Reminder for all in-person attendees

  • Please only attend the event in-person if you are feeling well; anyone feeling sick must stay home and may attend via the Zoom link
  • Hand sanitizer will be made available, and masks are recommended
  • All attendees must be seated while consuming food

November 16th, 2022

IEEE NCS/AP-S/MTT-S Chapter

Dr. Erik Lier: Practical Antenna Solutions Enabled by Soft
and Hard EM Surfaces and Metasurfaces

Time: Thursday Nov. 17th, 2022 at 2:00 pm MDT

Location: University of Alberta – DICE 7-395 (Pizza served)

Join via this link: here

Dr. Erik Lier

Dr. Erik Lier received his M.Sc. and Ph.D. from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. He started working as a university scientific assistant and later as a research scientist at the Electronics Laboratory (ELAB/SINTEF) at the university, carrying out national and international research on microwave antennas and feed components for the European Space Agency (ESA), INTELSAT, INMARSAT and other satellite organizations and radar companies. He spent a year at UCLA as a visiting scholar studying phased array antenna technology.
He co-invented the concept of “Soft and Hard electromagnetic surfaces” which is related to the field of electromagnetic bandgap (EBG) structures and complex surfaces. Since 1990 he has been with Lockheed Martin Space, where he has been involved in developing new spacecraft antenna and payload technology. He was instrumental in building up shaped reflector capability in the company which resulted in winning the Asiasat-2 satellite program. He has been involved in the development and modernization of the GPS satellite payload for over more than 20 years. His main research interest and contribution has been in the field of phased array antennas, including design, analysis, system engineering, calibration and test. He was the phased array architect for two phased arrays launched into space. He headed up the internal metamaterials research collaboration effort within the company, which has included university collaboration and has led to several groundbreaking and practical metamaterial-enhanced antennas for space and ground applications. He is granted 37 US patents, has authored and co-authored over 140 journal and conference papers, including two papers in the journal Nature, co-authored one book and authored a book chapter. He received the 2014 IEEE Antennas and Propagation Harold A. Wheeler Applications Prize Paper Award. He is a Lockheed Martin Senior Technical Fellow, a Life Fellow of IEEE and a Fellow of IET.

Abstract

The presentation will describe how the concept of electromagnetically soft and hard
surfaces and metamaterial horns (metahorns) came about. I will also discuss practical
antennas enabled by these EM techniques, as well as future opportunities and
challenges in antenna and RF design.

Reminder for all in-person attendees

  • Please only attend the event in-person if you are feeling well; anyone feeling sick must stay home and may attend via the Zoom link
  • Hand sanitizer will be made available, and masks are recommended
  • All attendees must be seated while consuming food

October 3rd, 2022

IEEE NCS/AP-S/MTT-S Chapter

Time: Thursday Oct. 6th, 2022 at 11:00 am MDT

Location: University of Alberta – DICE 7-395 (Pizza served)

Join via this link: here

Dr. Reyhan Baktur is an associate professor at the department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), Utah State University (USU). Her research interests include antennas and microwave engineering with a focus on antenna design for CubeSats; optically transparent antennas; multifunctional integrated antennas, sensors, and microwave circuits. She is affiliated with the Center for Space Engineering at USU, the Space Dynamics Laboratory (the university affiliated research center), and collaborates with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Dr. Baktur is an AdCom member of IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society, and is active in US National Committee of the International
Committee of the International Union of Radio Science, serving as the vice chair for commission B, and the inaugural chair for the Women in Radio Science. She is passionate and committed to electromagnetic education and student recruiting by introducing CubeSat projects in undergraduate classrooms. She is the recipient of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society’s (APS) the Donald G. Dudley Jr. Undergraduate Teaching Award in 2013 and has been actively serving IEEE APS student paper competition and student design contest.

Abstract

Optically transparent antennas have been gaining steady interests- from integration with glass panels to contact lens, from aesthetic purpose to security reasons, from vehicular safety monitoring to space communication, just to name a few examples. Naturally, two main questions one may ask are: (1) how do we achieve optical transparency? and (2) how do we design the most optimal antenna for the application of interest?
The current answer for the first question is to transparent conductors, or conductive mesh, like chicken wire or the screens on the window of a microwave oven. It is obvious that the second option is not transparent to human vision. But it has the advantage of being simple and not heavily replying on material processing. Transparent conductors include transparent oxide, graphene, silver nanowire, and carbon nanotube-based conductors. The material design and processing for the transparent conductors can be delicate and challenging, but the advantage of these conductive thin films is that they can be near-invisible to sight.
This lecture presents the fundamentals of major types of transparent antennas, trade-off between the transparency and antenna efficiency, application notes, and near-future approaches.

Reminder for all in-person attendees

  • Please only attend the event in-person if you are feeling well; anyone feeling sick must stay home and may attend via the Zoom link
  • Hand sanitizer will be made available, and masks are recommended
  • All attendees must be seated while consuming food

September 7th, 2022

IEEE NCS/AP-S/MTT-S Chapter

Time: Sept. 14th, 2022 at 2:00 pm MDT

Location: University of Alberta – DICE 7-395 (Pizza served)

Join via this link: here

Dr. Cynthia M. Furse is a Fellow of the IEEE and the National Academy of Inventors, and is a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. Her research interests are the application of electromagnetics to sensing and communication in complex lossy scattering media such as the human body, geophysical prospecting, ionospheric plasma, and complex wiring networks. Dr. Furse is a founder of LiveWire Innovation, Inc., a spin-off company from her research, commercializing devices to locate intermittent faults on live wires. She has taught electromagnetics, wireless communication, computational electromagnetics, microwave engineering, antenna design, introductory electrical engineering, and engineering entrepreneurship and has been a leader in the development of the flipped classroom. Dr. Furse is an Associate Editor for the Transactions on Antennas and Propagation (AP), a member of the IEEE AP Young Professionals Committee, a past Administrative Committee member for the IEEE AP society, and past chair of the IEEE AP Education Committee. She has received numerous teaching and research awards including the 2020 IEEE Chen To Tai Distinguished Educator Award.

Abstract

Implantable antennas have been used for communication with medical implants for decades. Since then, wireless medical telemetry systems and their associated implantable antennas have expanded rapidly.  Implantable medical devices now touch virtually every major function in the human body. Cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators, neural recording and stimulation devices,

cochlear and retinal implants are just a few of the many implantable medical devices available today.  Wireless telemetry for these devices is necessary to monitor battery level and device health, upload reprogramming for device function, and download data for patient monitoring. Emerging medical telemetry devices have led to recent advances in the design of small, biocompatible antennas that can be implanted in the human body.  This paper will track the types of antennas seen in the past, the technologies that enabled these changes, and prospects for future implantable antennas for medical applications.


January 18th, 2022

Thursday, Jan. 26 2022, 10:00 am (MST)

Join Zoom via this link: here

Speaker:

Distinguished Microwave Lecturer: Dr. Jasmin Grosinger

Jasmin Grosinger (Senior Member, IEEE) received the Dipl.-Ing. (M.Sc.) degree (Hons.) in telecommunications and the Dr.techn. (Ph.D.) degree (Hons.) from the Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria, in 2008 and 2012, respectively. In January 2021, she received her Venia Docendi in RF and microwave engineering from the Graz University of Technology, Graz, Austria.Prof. Grosinger was involved with various projects dealing with RFID at the Institute of Telecommunications, Vienna University of Technology, from 2008 to 2013, and with RFID sensor project with Disney Research in Pittsburgh 2011. From 2013 to 2017, she was a Post-Doctoral Researcher with the Institute of Microwave and Photonic Engineering, Graz University of Technology, focusing on RFID technologies research, where she became an Assistant Professor in 2017, and an Associate Professor in 2021. In 2018, 2019, and 2021, she was a Guest Professor at the Institute of Electronics, Friedrich-Alexander-University (FAU) Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany. She has authored more than 60 peer-reviewed publications and holds one U.S. patent.Prof. Grosinger is actively involved in the Technical Program and Steering Committees of various RF-related conferences and is an Associate Editor of the IEEE MICROWAVE AND WIRELESS COMPONENTS LETTERS. She is a member of the IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society (MTT-S) and the Union Radio-Scientifique Internationale Austria (Commission D). Within MTT-S, she serves as a Distinguished Microwave Lecturer (Tatsuo Itoh DML class of 2022–2024), a member of the IEEE MTT-S Technical Committees MTT-25 Wireless Power Transfer and Energy Conversion Committee and MTT-26 RFID, Wireless Sensors and IoT Committee, and as the Co-Chair of the Women in Microwaves Sub-Committee of the Member and Geographic Activities Committee. In 2022, she serves as the MTT-S AdCom Secretary.

Abstract

In this talk, I will present radio frequency (RF) design solutions for wireless sensor nodes
to solve sustainability issues in the Internet of things (IoT), which arise due to the massive
deployment of wireless IoT nodes on environmental and economic levels. Engineers can apply
these RF design solutions to improve the ultra-low-power operation of IoT nodes, avoid batteries’
eco-toxicity, and decrease maintenance costs due to battery replacement. The presented solutions
offer high integration levels based on system-on-chip and system-in-package concepts in lowcost complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technologies to limit costs and carbon footprints
of these nodes.
Within this research context, I will present solutions for ultra-low-power wireless
communication systems based on high frequency (HF) and ultra-high frequency (UHF) radio
frequency identification (RFID) technologies. In particular, I will present RF design solutions for
HF and UHF RFID systems that reveal how to develop passive miniaturized IoT nodes that
operate robustly in harsh application environments and how to create batteryless or rather passive
IoT nodes, which provide passive sensing capabilities and work robustly in their respective
application environment.


May 28th, 2021

Time: June 14th, 2021 at 1:30 pm EDT

Join via this link: here

Speaker: Dr. Quevedo-Teruel at KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Oscar Quevedo-Teruel is a Senior Member of the IEEE. He received his Telecommunication Engineering Degree from Carlos III University of Madrid, Spain in 2005, part of which was done at Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden. He obtained his Ph.D. from Carlos III University of Madrid in 2010 and was then invited as a postdoctoral researcher to the University of Delft (The Netherlands). From 2010-2011, Dr. Quevedo-Teruel joined the Department of Theoretical Physics of Condensed Matter at Universidad Autonoma de Madrid as a research fellow and went on to continue his postdoctoral research at Queen Mary University of London from 2011-2013.

In 2014, he joined the Division for Electromagnetic Engineering in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden where he is an Associate Professor and Director of the Master Programme in Electromagnetics Fusion and Space Engineering. He has been an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation since 2018 and is the founder and editor-in-chief of the EurAAP journal Reviews of Electromagnetics since 2020. He was the EurAAP delegate for Sweden, Norway, and Iceland from 2018-2020, and he has been a member of the EurAAP Board of Directors since January 2021. He is a distinguished lecturer of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society for the period of 2019-2022, and Chair of the IEEE APS Educational Initiatives Programme since 2020.

He has made scientific contributions to higher symmetries, transformation optics, lens antennas, metasurfaces, leaky wave antennas and high impedance surfaces. He is the co-author of 95 papers in international journals and 140 at international conferences.

Abstract

Fig. 1: Transformation of a cylindrical wave into a plane wave by using a convex lens represented with rays and waves.

Lens antennas are commonly englobed in a more general type of antennas, named aperture antennas. As their name indicates, they make use of a lens to modify the field distribution at the aperture of the antenna, which is typically fed by a single source. The lens is employed to transform the waves arriving from the source into a desired radiation pattern. Commonly, the desired radiation pattern is a directive beam in a given direction. However, similar to arrays, reflectors or leaky wave antennas, the goal changes depending on the application. For example, other desired features may be to produce multiple beams, or a broad beam-width.

Lenses were more commonly employed in optical applications. For this reason, most of the nomenclature comes from optics, and they are evaluated with rays theory. In this sense, the performance of the lens is conventionally described in terms of aberrations. An aberration is a failure of the rays to converge at the desired focus. This failure must be due to a defect or an improper design. Aberrations are classified as chromatic or monochromatic, depending on whether or not they have a frequency dependence. There are five monochromatic aberrations: spherical aberration, coma, astigmatism, Petzval field curvature, and distortion. However, this is not a common nomenclature for antenna designers in the radio-frequency and microwave regimes. In these regimes, the rays are substituted by electromagnetic fields, and the designers evaluate their antennas in terms of directivity, gain, efficiency, side lobe levels, cross polarization levels, etc. Therefore, there is a communication gap between both communities: optics and microwaves. In the THz regime, which is in between these two communities, researchers must understand both nomenclatures

In this talk, I will explain the operation of lens antennas, their potential, and two innovative techniques that have become very important in recent years. The first technique is transformation optics, which can be employed to produce three-dimensional directive lenses. The second one is metasurfaces, which can be used to produce low-cost and planar two-dimensional lenses. In the case of metasurfaces, fully metallic solutions are possible, which is a clear advantage in terms of losses. However, with the available technology, metasurfaces are only able to scan in one single plane. Finally, we introduce the concept of higher symmetries, that can be employed to enhance the bandwidth of conventional metasurfaces, or to increase their equivalent refractive indexes.


February 15th, 2012

Welcome to the IEEE Northern Canada AP/MTT Jt. Chapter website!

The Antennas and Propagation Society and the Microwave Theory and Techniques Society are two predominant societies in the IEEE with thousands of members, massive international conferences, and numerous publications. This website will contain information on upcoming chapter activities, information about our two parent chapters, and resources for graduate and undergraduate students. Below is a map of the NCS governing area.

 


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