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IEEE Talk: Optimization of DSP-Based Optical Communication Links Beyond 100Gbps

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2022

Title: Optimization of DSP-Based Optical Communication Links Beyond 100Gbps

Speaker: Tony Chan Carusone                

Professor, University of Toronto

Chief Technology Officer, Alphawave IP Group

Date: Monday, August 8th

Time: 2pm

Location: Walter Light Hall Rm 302, Queen’s University

Abstract:

Progress in computation and communication is increasingly bottlenecked by integrated circuit I/O. Previously reserved for communication over 100’s of kilometres, today optical links are widely viewed as the primary solution for chip-to-chip links above 100 Gbps and up to 1 km.  Meanwhile, CMOS technology scaling has led us toward integrated circuit transceivers that are, essentially, complete modems: thin but critical analog front-end circuits and a large custom DSP.  This presentation will describe how to co-design of DSP transceivers with a thin but critical analog front-end and the associated optical components to create optical links serving future datacentre communication needs.  As an example, a 4-PAM CMOS linear TIA designed in a FinFET technology consuming less than 50 mW and co-packaged alongside photodiodes is presented. The circuits and packaging are co-designed to maximize the passive front-end BW. Experimental results confirm the integrated optical fibre receiver operates up to 160-Gb/s using a single wavelength with a suitable DSP.

Bio:

Tony Chan Carusone has been a faculty member at the University of Toronto since completing his Ph.D. there in 2002.  He has co-authored eight award-winning papers on chip-to-chip and optical communication circuits, ADCs, and clock generation.  He has also been a consultant to industry since 1997.  He is currently the Chief Technology Officer of Alphawave in Toronto, Canada.

Dr. Chan Carusone was a Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society 2015-2017 and served on the Technical Program Committee of the International Solid-State Circuits Conference from 2015-2021.  He co-authored the latest editions of the classic textbooks “Analog Integrated Circuit Design” along with D. Johns and K. Martin, and “Microelectronic Circuits” along with A. Sedra and K.C. Smith. He has served as Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems II: Express Briefs, an Associate Editor for the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, and is now Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Letters.  He is a Fellow of the IEEE.

Ingenuity Labs and IEEE Joint Invited Lecture – Uncertainty Assessment for Deep Networks: Making Autonomous Driving Perception Aware of Its Own Limitations

Sunday, November 3rd, 2019

The EMB/RA/CS Societies Joint Chapter of IEEE Kingston and Queen’s Ingenuity Labs Research Institute are proud to present the following invited lecture:

 

UNCERTAINTY ASSESSMENT FOR DEEP NETWORKS: MAKING AUTONOMOUS DRIVING PERCEPTION AWARE OF ITS OWN LIMITATIONS

 

Date:  Wednesday November 20th, 2019.

Time:  12:30 – 1:30 PM

Location: Mitchell Hall, Room 395, Queen’s University 

Speaker:  Prof. Steve Waslander, University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS). Director, Toronto Robotics and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (TRAILab).

Light Refreshments: 1:30 – 2:00PM, Mitchell Hall, Room 395, Queen’s University

 

Abstract

Most autonomous vehicle perception approaches are primarily reliant on modern deep neural networks (DNNs).   DNNs have shown breakthrough performance or object detection, tracking and prediction, scene segmentation, vehicle localization and mapping, providing accurate bounding boxes for vehicles and pedestrians, lane boundaries and signage over extensive datasets and on-road testing. Yet, these networks are not uniformly consistent in the quality of their perception outputs, and much can be gained by accumulating evidence over time.  In this talk, I will lay out our progress in 3D object detection to improve detection accuracy for a range of sensor configurations, and demonstrate the effects of adverse weather on these approaches.  Further, I will describe our approach to providing reliable uncertainty estimates for network outputs that enable proper Bayesian inference when incorporating prior information and tracking object motion through time.

 

Speaker Bio:

Prof. Steven Waslander is a leading authority on autonomous aerial and ground vehicles, including multirotor drones and self-driving cars.  He received his B.Sc.E.in 1998 from Queen’s University, his M.S. in 2002 and his Ph.D. in 2007, both from Stanford University in Aeronautics and Astronautics, where as a graduate student he created the Stanford Testbed of Autonomous Rotorcraft for Multi-Agent Control (STARMAC), the world’s most capable outdoor multi-vehicle quadrotor platform at the time. He was recruited to Waterloo from Stanford in 2008, where he founded and directs the Waterloo Autonomous Vehicle Laboratory (WAVELab), extending the state of the art in autonomous drones and autonomous driving through advances in localization and mapping, object detection and tracking, integrated planning and control methods and multi-robot coordination. His work on autonomous vehicles has resulted in the Autonomoose, the first autonomous vehicle created at a Canadian University to drive on public roads. His insights into autonomous driving have been featured in the Globe and Mail, Toronto Star, National Post, the Rick Mercer Report, and on national CBC Radio.  In 2018, he joined the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS), and founded the Toronto Robotics and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (TRAILab).

To attend this seminar, RSVP by clicking this Link

For more information, please contact Dr. Joshua Marshall or Dr. Keyvan Hashtrudi-Zaad

 

 

 

 

 

Integrated Terrestrial/Aerial 6G Networks for Ubiquitous 3D Super-Connectivity in 2030s

Monday, November 5th, 2018

The Joint Communications & Computer Chapter of IEEE Kingston Section is proud to present the following IEEE distinguished lecture:

 

INTEGRATED TERRESTRIAL/AERIAL 6G NETWORKS FOR UBIQUITOUS 3D SUPER-CONNECTIVITY IN 2030s

 

 

Date:  Tuesday Nov. 13th, 2018.

Time:  2:00 – 3:00 PM

Location: Queens University, Walter Light Hall, Room 302

Speaker:  Professor Halim Yanikomeroglu

Abstract:  As the 5G standards are currently being developed with a scheduled completion date of late-2019, it is time to reinitiate a brainstorming endeavour followed by the technical groundwork towards the subsequent generation (6G) wireless networks of 2030s.

One reasonable starting point in this new 6G discussion is to reflect on the possible shortcomings of the 5G networks to-be-deployed. 5G promises to provide connectivity for a broad range of use-cases in a variety of vertical industries; after all, this rich set of scenarios is indeed what distinguishes 5G from the previous four generations. Many of the envisioned 5G use-cases require challenging target values for one or more of the key QoS elements, such as high rate, high reliability, low latency, and high energy efficiency; we refer to the presence of such demanding links as the super-connectivity.

However, the very fundamental principles of digital and wireless communications reveal that the provision of ubiquitous super-connectivity in the global scale – i.e., beyond indoors, dense downtown or campus-type areas – is infeasible with the legacy terrestrial network architecture as this would require prohibitively expensive gross over-provisioning. The problem will only exacerbate with even more demanding 6G use-cases such as UAVs requiring connectivity (ex: delivery drones), thus the need for 3D super-connectivity.

In this talk, we will present a 5-layer vertical architecture composed of fully integrated terrestrial and aerial layers for 6G networks of 2030s:

  • Terrestrial HetNets with macro-, micro-, and pico-BSs
  • Flying-BSs (aerial-/UAV-/drone-BSs);                      altitude: up to several 100 m
  • High Altitude Platforms (HAPs) (floating-BSs);       altitude: ~20 km
  • Very Low Earth Orbit (VLEO) satellites;                  altitude: 200-1,000 km
  • Geostationary Orbit (GEO) satellites;                        altitude: 35,786 km

In the absence of a clear technology roadmap for the 2030s, the talk has, to a certain extent, an exploratory view point to stimulate further thinking and creativity. We are certainly at the dawn of a new era in wireless research and innovation; the next twenty years will be very interesting

 

Speaker Bio:  Halim Yanikomeroglu is a Professor at Carleton University. His research covers many aspects of communications technologies with emphasis on wireless networks. He supervised 20 PhD students (all completed with theses). He coauthored 360+ peer-reviewed research papers including 120+ in the IEEE journals; these publications have received 11,000+ citations. He is a Fellow of IEEE, a Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Communications Society, and a Distinguished Speaker for the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society. He has been one of the most frequent tutorial presenters in the leading international IEEE conferences (29 times). He has had extensive collaboration with industry which resulted in 25 granted patents (plus more than a dozen applied). During 2012-2016, he led one of the largest academic-industrial collaborative research projects on pre-standards 5G wireless, sponsored by the Ontario Government and the industry. He served as the General Chair and Technical Program Chair of several major international IEEE conferences.

 

This seminar is open to the general public with free admission, pizza and refreshments.

For more information, please contact Dr. François Chan, chan-f@rmc.ca

2018 Annual Banquet – October 29, 2018

Thursday, October 25th, 2018

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IEEE Kingston Section cordially invites

IEEE Members, Students, Staff and Well Wishers to its

 2018 IEEE Annual Banquet.

 

with Keynote Speaker

 

Prof. Karen Rudie

IEEE Fellow, Professor,

Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engineering,

Queen’s University Kingston, Ontario

 

on

 

October 29th  2018, 

from 6:00pm at the

Renaissance Event Venue (Lower Salon) – 285 Queen St, Kingston, ON K7K 1B7

 

 

Dinner Menu:

  1. Chicken Breast Fricassee
  2. Georgian Stuffed Pepper (Vegan)

 

About the keynote speaker:

Professor Karen Rudie received her Ph.D. from the University of Toronto, in the Systems Control Group. Just before coming to Queen’s she was a postdoc at the Institute for Mathematics and its Applications in Minneapolis. Since 1993 she has been at Queen’s University where she is a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, with a cross-appointment in the School of Computing. She was an IEEE Control Systems Society Distinguished Lecturer and has served as an Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology, the Journal of Discrete Event Dynamic Systems, IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, and IEEE Control Systems Magazine. She is a Fellow of the IEEE. Her research focuses on the control of discrete-event systems.

 

Ticket Prices: (Deadline for purchase is 26 October, 2018)

Non-student registration $35.00
Student registration $20.00

 

 

 

Purchase tickets:

  • Online: https://events.vtools.ieee.org/meeting_registration/register/178237