Upcoming Presenters

2021 – IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society



 

Virtual Meeting

IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

12 Aug 2021 @ 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM MT

Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer,

 

Dr. Haadi Jafarian

 Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Director of Active Cyber and Infrastructure Defense (ACID) lab at University of Colorado Denver

 

Dr. Jafarian is an assistant professor, and the director of Active Cyber and Infrastructure Defense (ACID) laboratory at the CSE department. His primary research includes active cyber defense, resilient infrastructures, and data analytics for cyber threat intelligence. He has authored over 30 scholarly conference and journal publications (IEEE TIFS, IEEE INFOCOMM, ESORICS), including several noteworthy works on moving target defense, cyber deception, web security, and network security. He is currently advising five Ph.D. students and several master students in the ACID lab, where most of lab’s research is focused on data-driven cybersecurity analytics.

 

Presentation: Defeating traffic analysis attacks: challenges and countermeasures

 

Abstract: While encryption protects communications from on-path eavesdropping and man-in-the-middle attacks, it does not protect them against privacy threats realized via advanced traffic analysis algorithms. Traffic analysis refers to ever-growing side-channel attacks that rely on sophisticated machine learning algorithms to enable an on-path attacker to classify the encrypted packets based on unencryptable features of the traffic, such as packet sizes, counts, and timings which are not modified by the encryption algorithms, to infer sensitive information from eavesdropped encrypted communications. Examples include traffic analysis attacks that identify the spoken language or even the speaker in a conversation over encrypted VoIP packets or visited web pages or other user activities from encrypted HTTP packets. In this talk, we first provide an overview of traffic analysis attacks and show that existing countermeasures like packet padding are in no way sufficient or effective in addressing them. We then discuss the characteristics of an ideal defense mechanism for obfuscating footprints of encrypted traffic. Finally, we discuss a novel approach based on proactive cyber defense paradigms, including moving target defense and cyber deception, to realize this ideal countermeasure against traffic analysis attacks.

 

Location: – Virtual – WebEx

Invited: IEEE members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free

 



 

Virtual Meeting

IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

09 Sept 2021 @ 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM MT

Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer,

 

Mr. Kevin Havis

Industrial Engineer, Data Visualization Expert, & Engineering Leader

Lockheed Martin Operations

 

Mr. Kevin Havis holds a Masters of Engineering in Industrial and Systems Engineering and a BS in Mechanical Engineering from Texas A&M University. Mr. Havis is a professional Industrial Engineer with an additional seven years of experience in operations, focusing on supply chain and manufacturing. Mr. Havis’s current position allows him to create, design, and support strategic standardization of data collection and integration across operations at Lockheed Martin Space in Denver, Colorado. Kevin is a data visualization leader with a certification in Tableau Desktop Administration. Within Lockheed Martin, his improvements in data systems have aided several workplace performance objectives, reducing the frustration of data ambiguity across several lines of business within Lockheed Martin. 

Kevin Havis has been educated on and established himself as a subject matter expert in Six Sigma and Lean production best practices and is responsible for the refinement of numerous business processes and metrics at Lockheed Martin Space. Kevin also spends his time as a tutor, volunteer, and mentor for high school students in downtown Denver. 

 
 

Presentation: Data Driven Decisions and Continuous Improvement

Abstract: While “data driven decision making” is a concept that is professed to be used across industries, executives still tend to lean toward trusting their gut and using heuristics in their decision making process. By considering the experiences of the audience, the context of the decision space, and the data being presented, we can help consumers of information overcome their intuitive biases and make decisions based on data. Drawing from his experiences of using data to influence behavior in a manufacturing environment, Kevin Havis will explore three factors to consider when evaluating how to use data, bringing a systems thinking perspective to the art of using data convincingly. We will discuss how to present data in a way that makes conclusions obvious and actionable with a final goal of improving your future projects quality and time to build. Finally, we will review some common errors when presenting data within hardware and software projects and systems engineering and how to use the lean technique of “Plan-Do-Check-Adjust” to arrive at great orginization and visuals that will propel your program in to ever improved qualities.

 

Location: – Virtual – WebEx

Invited: IEEE members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free

 



 

Virtual Meeting

IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

14 October 2021 @ 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM MT

Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer,

 

Dr. Tom Williams

Computer and Cognitive Scientist 

Colorado School of Mines  

 

Tom Williams holds a PhD in Computer Science and Cognitive Science and MS in Computer Science from Tufts University, and a BA in Computer Science with minors in Mathematics and Creative Writing from Hamilton College. Dr Williams is an Assistant Professor at the Colorado School of Mines, where he directs the Mines Interactive Robotics Research Laboratory (MIRRORLab), with ten years of research experience in the fields of Human-Robot Interaction, Cognitive Systems, and Artificial Intelligence. Dr Williams’ research interests focus on morally and socially competent human-robot communication through natural language.  

 Dr. Williams’ research has been supported by multiple federal agencies, including Early Career Awards from NSF, NASA, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Tom has taken leadership roles in the organization of the international conferences on Human Robot Interaction and Social Robotics, and has been a featured member of the ACM.

 
 

Presentation: Secret Agents: The Real and Imagined Inner Lives of Interactive Robots 

Abstract: This presentation focuses on the role that notions of agency play in the design of language-capable interactive robots. I will begin by explaining the overall impact that robot design choices have on how people perceive robots and expect them to behave. I’ll then explain why robots are not simply agents, but are also moral and social agents, and describe the work the MIRRORLab has been doing to understand and address the unique perceptions and expectations that come along with these more nuanced types of agency. In doing so, I will cover not only the computational aspects of our work, but also the way that our work is informed by theories and methods from psychology (cognitive, human factors, social, and moral), philosophy (of mind, of language, of morality), linguistics, design, and other fields. 

 

Location: – Virtual – WebEx

Invited: IEEE members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free

 



 

2022 – IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society



 

Virtual Meeting

IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

10 February 2022 @ 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM MT

Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer,

Dr. Tarek El-Ghazawi

Professor High-Performance Computing at George Washington University 

IEEE Computer Society Distinguished Speaker

 
 

Tarek El-Ghazawi is a Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at The George Washington (GW) University, where he leads the university-wide Strategic Academic Program in High-Performance Computing. He is the founding director of The GW Institute for Massively Parallel Applications and Computing Technologies (IMPACT) and was a founding Co-Director of the NSF Industry/University Center for High-Performance Reconfigurable Computing (CHREC). Dr. El-Ghazawi’s research interests include high-performance computing, computer architectures, reconfigurable and embedded computing, nano-photonic based computing, and computer vision and remote sensing. Dr. El-Ghazawi is also one of the pioneers of the area of High-Performance Reconfigurable Computing (HPRC).

Dr. El-Ghazawi was also one of the early researchers in Cluster Computing and has built the first GW cluster in 1995. At present, he is leading efforts for rebooting computing based on new paradigms including analog, nano-photonic, and neuromorphic computing. He has served on many boards and served as a consultant for organizations like CESDIS and RIACS at NASA GSFC and NASA ARC, IBM, and ARSC. He has published over 250 refereed research publications in his area and his work is funded extensively by government organizations like DARPA, NSF, AFOSR, NASA, DoD, and industrial organizations such as Intel, AMD, HP, SGI. Dr. El-Ghazawi has served in many editorial roles and has chaired numerous IEEE international conferences and symposia, including IEEE PGAS 2015, IEEE/ACM CCGrid2018, DSS 2017 to name a few.

Presentation: Rebooting Computing — The Search for Post-Moore’s Law Breakthroughs

Abstract: The field of high-performance computing (HPC) or supercomputing refers to the building and using computing systems that are orders of magnitude faster than our common systems. The top supercomputer, Summit, can perform 148,600 trillion calculations in one second (148.6 PF on LINPAC). The top two supercomputers are now in the USA followed by two Chinese supercomputers. Many countries are racing to break the record and build an ExaFLOP supercomputer that can perform more than one million trillion (quintillion) calculations per second. In fact, the USA is planning two supercomputers in 2021 one of which, when fully operational (Frontier), will perform at 1.5 EF. Scientists however are concerned that we are reaching many physical limits and we need new innovative ideas to make it to the next generation of computing. This talk will consider where we stand and where we are going with the current state of supercomputing with emphasis on future processors, and some of the ideas that scientists are looking at to re-invent computing. A comparative understanding of Neuromorphic and Brain-Inspired Computing, Quantum Computing, and innovative computing paradigms will be provided along with an assessment of progress so far and the road ahead. Further, I will cover some of our own progress on Nanophotnonic PostMoore’s law processing efforts.

Location: – Virtual – WebEx

Invited: IEEE members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free