Honors



* Honors and Past Events – 2020 *



Virtual Meeting

IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

08 October 2020 @ 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM MT

Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer,

Dr. Aju Jugessur

Director, Colorado Nanofabrication and Characterization (COSINC) Center

University of Colorado, Boulder

Aju Jugessur received a PhD in Optoelectronics, Electronic engineering with a focus on nanofabrication from the University of Glasgow, followed by a postdoctoral fellowship at McGill University. Dr. Jugessur expertise is in the area of photonic devices, nanolithography and nanofabrication. Dr. Jugessur was a senior research scientist in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Toronto and the manager of the nanolithography facility, Toronto Nanofabrication Center, where he spearheaded the establishment and development of a state-of-the-art nanolithography facility. Dr. Jugessur has introduced several training materials and courses on nanolithography, micro- and nano fabrication and developed the first online, real-time course in the area of nanofabrication. Dr. Jugessur founded the University of Iowa Microfabrication Facility and led the facility as its director from April 2012 to September 2018. Dr. Jugessur is currently the Director of the Colorado Shared Instrumentation in Nanofabrication and Characterization (COSINC) within the College of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Colorado, Boulder.

Dr. Jugessur has extensive experience in leading the design, development and management of state-of-the-art nanoscale cleanroom facilities for research, education and training. Dr. Jugessur’s research interests are at the crossroads of several areas such as photonic crystals, nanofabrication and optical sensing. Dr. Jugessur has authored numerous scientific and technical journal publications and is also a Senior member of IEEE.

Presentation: Shared Facilities Enabling Nanoscale Science and Technology

Nanoscale fabrication and material characterization is the meeting ground of diverse disciplines ranging from engineering, physics, chemistry to environmental science, biology, and medicine. Most of these disciplines converge at the nanoscale, towards the same building blocks, principles, tools of investigation and fabrication. The Colorado Shared Instrumentation in Nanofabrication and Characterization (COSINC) offers a platform for the convergence of multiple scientific and engineering disciplines and facilitates collaborative research with strategic partners and information exchange.  COSINC aspires to play an instrumental role in leading Colorado in these areas within the region, while impacting and enabling innovations in a wide range of scientific and technological research areas, ranging from electronics, photonics, quantum science, energy and environment to bio-medical, pharmaceutical and nanomedicine. This presentation will present several key capabilities and state-of-the art instrumentation for nanoscale fabrication and characterization, including a broad range of research projects and application areas, enabled by the technologies within COSINC.

Location: – Virtual – WebEx

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Invited: IEEE members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free



Joint Event

IEEE Colorado Springs Computer Society

IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

01 October 2020 @ 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM MT

Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer,

Dr. Trung T. Pham

Professor & Researcher

Cyberworx and Department of Computer Science of the United States Air Force Academy

Dr. holds a BS, MS, and PhD in Electrical & Computer Engineering from Rice University in Houston Texas. Dr Pham is a research engineer with over 20 years of experience in space industry, and a professor with over 15 years of experience.

Dr Pham is currently working for the Cyberworx and Department of Computer Science of the United States Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA. Previously Dr Pham has worked at NASA Johnson Space Center, the University of Houston, and the University of Talca. Dr Pham’s research interests include artificial intelligence, computational algorithms, cryptology, data mining, image processing, and system modeling. His most recent funded project is modeling of human memory where he found interest in quantum computing.

Dr. Trung is a Senior Member of the Institute of Electronic & Electrical Engineering and within the International Society of Automation. Dr Trung is an executive committee in the IEEE Pikes Peak Section and has previously served as the Vice Chair in Robotics for the IEEE Galveston Bay Section.

Presentation: Introduction to Quantum Computing

Abstract: This presentation is an introduction to quantum computing and will address the basic concepts of quantum computers and the usage of quantum bits to represent analog data. This presentation will example logical operators traditionally developed for standard semiconductor based computer binary data. Then we will extend standard binary processes in to quantum bits of data. The extended quantum computer operators will serve as guidelines for hardware developers to design basic quantum computing units that can be combined into a complex quantum computers. This Introduction to Quantum Computers presentation will cover the basics of standard computers in to more advanced quantum data and operators and is connected to the next months talk, “Developing Applications for Quantum Memory.”

Location: – Virtual – WebEx

Invited: IEEE members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free


Joint Event

IEEE Pikes Peak Computer Society &

IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

Date – 06 August 2020 @  5:00 PM – 6:00 PM MT

Denver IEEE Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society Guest Lecturer,

Mr. Gene Freeman

IEEE Life Member and 40 Year Computer and Electronics Engineer, Manager, and Subject Expert

IEEE Pike Peak Computer Society Chair

Gene Freeman worked in the Electronics Industry from 1977 until his retirement in 2018.  He worked in R and D both as an individual contributor and manager.   His employers included  Hughes Aircraft, Northrup, Teledyne Inet, Texas Instruments, NCR Microelectronics, Compaq, Hewlett Packard Enterprise.   He started out working with PC boards then moved to IC Development and then to System Integration.   Key products  included PC Servers, Microcomputers and Controllers , Volatile and Non Volatile Memories, Storage Interconnects, Graphic Chips, BMCs, DSPs, Automotive ASICS,  Optical Interconnects, and UPS Controllers.  Gene served on several patent committees and was a member of  industry consortia including ANSI T11 (Fibre Channel) and JEDEC Memory Committees.    He is the current chair of the IEEE Computer Society — Pikes Peak Chapter and a Life Member of IEEE.

Presentation: Who Invented the Integrated Circuit?

The integrated circuit is one of the greatest inventions of the 20th century and continues its dominance as an electronic packaging technology  in the 21st Century.  This talk focuses on its beginnings and looks at the controversies around attribution of “who was first?”  We start with the invention of the transistor by William Shockley in the 1940’s at Bell Labs.   We then talk about the motivation for the Integrated Circuit and look at the implementation approaches.   Finally, we examine the  Integrated Circuit patent  fight between Texas Instruments (Jack Kilby) and Fairchild Semiconductor (Robert Noyce).  We conclude with the Nobel Prize awarded to Jack Kilby from Texas Instruments in the year 2000.  As a special bonus we find out what Kilby’s IC prototype was worth in 2014. This technical meeting will be a joint virtual event with the Pikes Peak and Denver Computer societies please join us for another great event and a chance to meet out fellow engineers in Colorado Springs.

Location: – Virtual – WebEx

Invited: IEEE members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free


IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

13 February 2020 @ 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM MDT

Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer,

Mr. William Fischer

Biological, Electrical, and Information Systems Engineer

Patent Attorney

William Fischer holds a JD from the University of Colorado School of Law, a BS in Electrical Engineering from the College of Engineering & Applied Science of the University of Colorado – Boulder, a BS in Biotechnology from Rutgers University and an MS in Molecular Bioscience & Biotechnology from Lehigh University. Mr. Fischer is a licensed attorney in Colorado and Washington State, and is registered to practice as a patent attorney before the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office. William, along with his network of trusted professionals, assists businesses and individuals in a variety of business and personal matters. Mr. Fischer’s patent, trademark, copyright and trade secret law practice provides clients counseling, drafting, and advice on cost effective acquisition, protection and monetization of intellectual property to advance business goals. Mr. Fischer engages both domestic and foreign clients involved in business and technological endeavors in diverse industries, including communications, medical devices, robotics, financial services, automotive, aviation, oil and gas, integrated circuits, control systems, power generation and distribution, tools, machinery, and consumer products.

Mr. Fischer’s experience in multi-disciplinary science, engineering, business, and legal roles in diverse industries provides informed perspectives for executing intellectual property strategies for accomplishing business goals. William’s professional experience, including 10 years in patent practice, enables him to provide expert advice and services in electrical, computer, software, mechanical and biomedical engineering technologies spanning manufacturing, AI, IoT, control systems, business methods, mechanical devices, and industrial designs.

Presentation: Cost-effective intellectual property protection strategies

Abstract: With an ever increasing array of US and foreign entities filing patent applications for inventions, obtaining effective advice and assistant for your technical and business ventures is crucial. In this presentation, basics of patent law and the mechanics of seeking patent and other forms of intellectual property rights will be summarized. Some examples of patent applications and patent examination will be illustrated to demonstrate the process and to highlight potential pitfalls. Several ways to increase the odds of success and maximize the value of patent claims will be discussed, along with proven strategies to ensure that all potentially protectible aspects of inventions are analyzed and accounted for. Please come and join us for a great presentation from a scholar that has many great years of engineering and judicial experience. This will be a great event don’t miss it!

Location: – University of Denver, (Room 400) 2155 E Wesley Ave, Denver, CO 80208

Invited: IEEE members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free


IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

16 January 2020 @ 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM MDT

Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer,

Dr. Haluk Ogmen

Professor and Senior Associate Dean

Ritchie School of Engineering and Computer Science – University of Denver

Haluk Ogmen holds a B.Sc.A. and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering, both from the Université Laval, Québec, Canada. Haluk is a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and serves as Senior Associate Dean at the Ritchie School of Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Denver.  Haluk’s research interests include natural and artificial intelligence, human visual perception, attention, memory and learning. His research is multi-disciplinary and combines theoretical, computational, and empirical approaches to reverse-engineer the human brain.

Presentation: Artificial versus Natural Intelligence

Abstract: In this presentation, Dr Haluk Ogmen will provide a brief overview of the history of studies of intelligence and mind from a multi-disciplinary angle, including philosophy, psychology, neuroscience, and cognitive science perspectives. we will also discuss parallel efforts to build artificial intelligence systems and trace their relationships to the studies of natural intelligence. Dr Ogmen primary argument will support that, if artificial intelligence is to be more like human intelligence, it needs to abandon its aprioristic or empiristic bases and instead adopt a constructivistic approach following the stages of cognitive development in infants. This presentation is going to be a cutting edge venture into AI, artificial thought, and cognition – we hope to see you there.

Location: – University of Denver, (Room 200) 2155 E Wesley Ave, Denver, CO 80208

Invited: IEEE members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free



* Honors and Past Events – 2019 *



IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

12 December 2019 @ 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM MDT

Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer,

Dr. Stephan Gerali

Chief Software Architect and Engineer

Lockheed Martin Fellow

Dr. Gerali has his B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Colorado and his MBA from Colorado State University. Stephan is certified in Java, BEA WebLogic, Six Sigma and Secure Software Engineering. Dr. Gerali is a Lockheed Martin Fellow specializing in Software Architecture / Software Engineering with more than 22 years of experience working on large-scale distributed systems. Stephan is currently the Chief Architect for Space IT supporting solutions across the entire Space business area.

Within Lockheed Martin, Stephan has supported IS&GS (Information Systems & Global Solutions) in Army (All Source Analysis System and Future Combat System), USSTRATCOM (Strategic Threat Analysis Reporting System) and Air Force (Single Integrated Space Picture) command and control systems and within EIT (Enterprise IT) has supported LMPeople, LMCareers, Performance Based Logistics, University Relations Recruiter’s Network, Center for Leadership Excellence, Non-Employee Access Tracking, Infrastructure Health Management, Event Correlation & Analysis, Enterprise Data Warehouse / Business Intelligence and Digital Tapestry.

Presentation: Delivering Real Time Monitoring of Industrial Machines using AWS IoT Services

Abstract: We will learn how information technology may be teamed up with Amazon Web Services (AWS) to deliver an integrated Internet of Things (IoT) solution for data capture, data transformation, data storage, data analytics and data visualization for real time monitoring of industrial machines used in the IoT manufacturing process. This presentation will cover the deployment of a full IoT solution to include: Kepware ServerEX for connectivity to industrial protocols, AWS IoT Core for IoT data processing, Amazon S3 for scalable storage of IoT data, MTConnect for a common data model for industrial machine telemetry data, Amazon EMR for interactive analytics on IoT data, Tableau for visualization of IoT data and SIAT for automated anomaly detection for industrial telemetry data. In addition, we will summarize the future roadmap for other AWS IoT Services. Please join us for a great presenter and presentation on information technology, Amazon Web Services (AWS), and integrated Internet of Things (IoT) solutions and integration.

Location: – University of Denver, (Room 410) 2155 E Wesley Ave, Denver, CO 80208

Invited: IEEE members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free


IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

15 November 2019

Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer,

Mr. Wendell Chun

Electrical, Mechanical, and Systems Engineer

Director of Corporate Programs, and Professor at University of Denver

Mr Wendall Chun holds a MS in Industrial Administration from Carnegie Bosh Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, and a BS in Mechanical Engineering from University of Hawaii Manoa. Mr. Wendell Chun has more than 33 years of experience engineering spacecraft and robotics, including the Walking Beam rover and multiple DARPA research programs. Mr. Chun has taught many Denver engineering students with more than 20 years of teaching experience. Mr. Chun has taught for the Colorado School of Mines and currently the University of Colorado Denver, including such courses as design, controls, mechatronics, robotics, and systems engineering and even project management.

Mr. Chun has worked as a technical consultant and reviewer for DOE Headquarters, reviewer for NSF, and a reviewer for NASA Headquarters in the area of Robotics and Automation even helped several small businesses develop automated work cells for production assembly and packaging. Mr. Chun has also taken the lead in the IEEE locally and as an associate editor for the IEEE ICRA conference (2018/2019) and workshop organizer at IEEE ICRA 2012.

Presentation: Robotics Research and Development

Abstract: There has been a promise of robots and artificial intelligence to serve mankind in a futuristic machine age.  A major topic has been the role of automation and the role of human operators.  The required technologies are moving so fast, it is hard to say where this technology will lead us.  Both a robot and its environment can be complex, represented by uncertainties that has driven a need for autonomy.  There has been some successes in robotics such as the Mars Rovers.  In the beginning of the movement smart robot systems as demonstrated by research programs in exoskeletons, autonomous navigation, walking machines, military vehicles, aerial drones, polymorphic robots, and satellite servicing systems for spacecraft.  This talk will review the state of the art of the technology, the successes, and were we plan to be tomorrow.  This future may be predicated on machines that are able to think, learn, and reason about itself and its environment.  We touch on Moore’s law, the upcoming singularity, and the validity of the Turing test for intelligence.  Based on thirty years of hands-on-experience in this field, we take a look at current trends in both robotics and direction of artificial intelligence.

Location: – University of Denver, (Room 400) 2155 E Wesley Ave, Denver, CO 80208

Invited: IEEE members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free


IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

 18 October 2019  – Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer:

Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer,

Dr. Ashwin Pingali (ABD)

Information Technology Engineer, Manager, and Expert Consultant – Chief Technology Officer for Aivante

Ashwin Pingali has completed his PhD in Computer Science & Information Technology with the University of Colorado, Denver (All but Dissertation). An MBA in Operations, Information Systems and Marketing with the  Indian Institute of Management and a BS in Engineering Technology (Gold Medal Honors) with the Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Hyderabad India. Ashwin is currently working as the CTO for Aivante a health care fintech startup and Apps Consultants a company focused on bringing Big Data technologies into everyday business operations. Dr (ABD) Pangali Dissertation research on “How IT can change mental models to improve decision-making effectiveness” has lead him to curtail his theoretical academia pursuits for more applied research path. Ashwin’s current research focus and skills are in Artificial Intelligence, Deep Learning and Cognitive Computing, and his specialty is in bringing both graph based mathematical representations to healthcare expenditure contexts, creating probabilistic models of reasoning and using Big Data predictive technologies  to aid in the processing of large contextual graphs for actionable decision making.

Dr Panglai additionally consults with Dish Networks as a Data Scientist helping their budding Enterprise Data Science execute Predictive Modeling and Optimization projects in AdTech and Fraud Monitoring. Dr Pangali achievements at Dish Networks includes building a complex forecasting system to generate over 500,000 forecasts for improving yield management. Dr Pangali is currently working on Ad-Brain an initiative to embed AI into Ad capacity planning and pricing.

Presentation: Building Real Time Recommendation Engines

We are seeing recommendation engines at work everywhere. When we switch on Netflix, the shows that we see on the screen are coming from a recommendation engine. When we search google, the results that come as well as the ads that are displayed are the result of a complex interplay of several recommendation engines. In this presentation we will look at the mathematics behind Recommendation Engines. The talk will be a presentation but attendees can follow the presenter by getting their hands dirty in building a simple recommendation engine that uses a collaborative filter. (The tutorial will show how to Build an actual recommendation engine that makes recommendations for product purchases and movie recommendations.)   This presentation will describe how a graph database is useful when it comes to recommendations. Please come and join us.

Location: – University of Denver, (Room 357) 2155 E Wesley Ave, Denver, CO 80208

Invited: IEEE members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free


IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

12 September 2019

Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer,

Keith Graham

Professor of Embedded Systems Engineering – The University of Colorado

Keith Graham, is the “Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering” Department’s Associate Chair of Undergraduate Education at the University of Colorado (UC), Boulder. At UC Boulder Mr Graham is responsible for aligning the undergraduate education program and developing strategies to educate students for both future academia opportunities and as engineers in industry. Mr. Graham also teaches undergraduate courses in Embedded Software Engineering, Computer Architecture, and courses in CU’s Professional Master of Embedded Systems Engineering program in both firmware and hardware for Internet of Things application. Recently,

Mr. Graham has additionally also begun to teach a graduate level courses in customizing RISC-V processor cores for specific applications. The basis of this new course Application Specific Instruction Set Processor (ASIP) design has Keith on a journey of re-evaluating how we should teach Computer Architecture after the death of Moore’s Law. Mr. Graham’s research interests are leading him to currently work toward a project to investigate specialized processors for specific applications.

Presentation: Modernizing Computer Architecture Education after the death of Moore’s Law

Abstract: Is it the death of Moore’s Law that has limited the growth in performance of computers or did a different law breakdown? Dennard Scaling, the concept that as silicon technology node shrinks, the power proportionally will be reduced. For example, if the silicon processing node shrinks in half, power would be reduced in half allowing twice the number of transistors to be on the chip and dissipate the same power as the preceding technology. With Dennard Scaling beginning to breakdown around 2006, the number of transistors could still be added at the cost of dissipating more and more heat. Over the last several years, the power wall has been reached limiting the general processing performance growth from doubling every two years to 3-5%. The demands and requirements for processing power are far out pacing our ability to create faster and faster general processors. To meet today’s and future requirements, Application/Domain Specific Computer Architectures will need to be deployed. These architectures can be targeted specific processor cores or cores with customized processing elements to optimize the solution. This talk will discuss Computer Architecture in undergraduate education and possible new ways that Computer Architecture should be taught. We welcome you and hope to see you there, this is going to be a great event!

Location: – University of Denver, (Room 400) 2155 E Wesley Ave, Denver, CO 80208

Invited: IEEE members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free


IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

28 June 2019

Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer,

Hussien Hassen

Graduate Student Regis University – Information Security Graduating Student and Clinical Nurse

Mr. Hassen holds a Graduate Certificate in Cybersecurity from Regis University Colorado, Bachelor of Science in Health Information Management from Western Governors University Utah, Bachelor of Art in Cultural Anthropology from Teikyo Heights University Colorado and Associates of Nursing from Addis Ababa University Ethiopia. Mr. Hassen is engaging in Digital Entrepreneurship and Health information technologies since 2004. Mr. Hassen is presently working as A Clinical Nurse and College Aide at Adams 12 five-star schools. Mr. Hassen’s research interests are computer security, Blockchain Applications in Cybersecurity, health systems and financial systems. Mr. Hassen is a member of the The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), Member of The American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), and Member of Information Systems Audit and Control Association (ISACA).

Presentation: Anti Money Laundering in Distributed Ledger Technology – Cross Border Alliance

Abstract: Nontrade financial transactions that cross a border and do not route through traditional banking channels provoke economic instability in a given country. However, the rise of transaction laundering into prominence demanded strict banking regulatory enforcement action. The high banking transaction cost and rigidity of the Anti-Money Laundering (AML) governance structure are the impetus of business users to seek alternative operations. Stealthy shadow banks are persistent as a medium for money laundering, corruption, and terrorism financing for a cyber attack against existing transaction systems. This presentation will identify the detection and investigation of transaction laundering to combat terrorism financing and corruption. We will use the whole of government approach to support AML activities by deploying distributed ledger technology across existing services to significantly improve foreign exchange earnings of countries. Please join us!

Location: – University of Denver, (Room 300) 2155 E Wesley Ave, Denver, CO 80208

Invited: IEEE members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free


IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

09 May 2019

Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer,

Dr. Christopher Chang

Sr. Research Scientist – National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Chris Chang holds a PhD in Biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a BS in Biochemistry from Virginia Tech. Chris has additionally completed a postdoctoral study at the University of Florida, on computational chemistry of iron and manganese complexes related to nitrile hydrolysis and oxalate breakdown in biological systems. Chris is currently researching at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, CO. At NREL, Chris focuses on computing software and workflows, electronic structure, and quantum computing as an emerging technology. Chris is a Senior IEEE and a Computer Society member.

Chris has contributed to 27 scholarly articles and book chapters across such topics as high-performance computing (HPC), hydrogenase, systems biology, electronic structure and chemical bonding, EPR spectroscopy, enzymology, and molecular biology. Chris has received several honors, including a Ruth L. Kirschstein NIH postdoctoral fellowship, NREL Director’s and President’s awards, and most recently Department of Energy recognition for his role in benchmark and performance testing for Eagle, NREL’s latest multi-petaflop high performance computing cluster.

Presentation: High Performance Computing at the National Renewable Energy Lab

Abstract: As scaling laws and the relentless march of information technology have driven increasing fidelity and scope of simulations, computational science, engineering, and analytics (CSEA) has taken an ever greater role in engineering and investigation. This trend intersects the great challenges of our times at the National Renewable Energy Lab, where CSEA is actively applied to materials discovery, energy-efficient design, Smart Grid technologies, and much more. The new linchpin of this activity is Eagle, NREL’s 8-petaflop, 2100-node compute cluster. I will discuss the architecture of this machine, NREL’s Computational Science Center, research computing, and how trends that we see may shape our future systems.

Location: – University of Denver, (Room 300) 2155 E Wesley Ave, Denver, CO 80208

Invited: IEEE members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free


IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

25 April 2019

Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer,

Richard George

VP Strategic Services and Alliances Sierra-Cedar

Richard George holds a MS is Computer Science from DePaul University an MBA from the University of Utah, and a BS in Finance from the University of Utah. Richard George is the Vice President at Sierra-Cedar and leads the Strategic Services group which specializes in assisting clients to understand the expected effects of updating its human capital management and enterprise resource Planning systems.Richard speaks to national audiences and authors various articles published in online media. He serves in several NFPs in in Colorado and was awarded the BSA Medal of Honor by President Gerald Ford for saving a life at risk of his own.

Presentation: Costs/Benefits of Changing Human Capital, Financial, and Supply Chain Management Systems

Abstract: Many organizations have or are considering moving from on premise back office systems such as, Human Capital Management (HCM), Financial Management Systems (FMS), Supply Chain Management systems (SCM), to systems that are available in the Cloud such as Software as a Service (SaaS). This presentation will present research findings from 1,600 organizations on what back office systems they are using, why they are making a change and some misconceptions about both. Many are moving to SaaS due to update costs, operations, staffing levels, mobility, and the total cost of ownership (TCO). Research has revealed some surprising data which show that on premise systems may have some unexpected life left in them when features are enabled to provide end users with an intuitive and mobile platform. This presentation will be an exciting venture in to enterprise, financial, supply chain, management, and information systems, please join us.

Location: – University of Denver, Ritchie Engineering Building (Room 301), 2155 E Wesley Ave, Denver, CO 80208

Invited: IEEE members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free



IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

14 March 2019

Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer,

Ernest Worthman

Electronics Engineer, Researcher, Analyst, and Writer – Current Executive and Editor for Applied Wireless Technology

Ernest Worthman is the Executive Editor of AGL’s Applied Wireless Technology and Small Cell Magazine and former Technology Editor of Semiconductor Engineering’s IoX and security channels. He is also the principal of Worthman & Associates, a contract technical writing and editorial services organization as well as IEEE Senior Life member and IEEE Vehicular Technology Society Senior Member.

Mr. Worthman has over 25 years of experience in electrical engineering, high-tech print, and online publishing as an Editorial Director, Technical Editor and high-tech writer. He is also an expert in wireless, computer hardware/software and IT platforms, semiconductors, cybersecurity and the IoX (Internet of Everything). Ernest has publish many articles for Applied Wireless Technology, Small Cell Magazine, RF Design, Communications, Wireless Design and Development. His current clients include Keysight/Agilent Technologies, RF Industries, GLOBALFOUNDRIES, Advanced Linear Devices, IBM, City and County of Denver, and others.

Presentation on: A Flyover on the Wireless World of Tomorrow

Abstract: The Fly over of the Wireless World of Tomorrow summarizes many current and innovative information data systems and then leads in to many of the newest data communications formats and systems. We will look in to the 802.xx standards as well as some of the other types of communications systems that are leading our technological advancement. This presentation will take a closer look at our next communications power house 5G. Then compare and contrasts several other competing standards and formats. This presentation aims to shed light on what is the benefit of our future communications goals; alternatively, we will also take note of the major physical and technological problems to achieve these goals. Technical data communications is important because many very data intensive systems are just around the corner. In our future we will need every data bit to be sent faster and with better quality. Many research trends in data communications have shown repeatedly that people, places, things, vehicles, and even robots will need more data than we can provide. Where will we get this greater data communication medium? We have many technologies that are showing promise but which will end up as the fastest, most robust, and provide the best service at lower costs. Please join us for A Flyover on the Wireless World of Tomorrow.

Location: The University of Denver, Ritchie School of Engineering (RM 300).

Date is 14 Mar 2019 – 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm. 2nd Thursday

Invited: IEEE Members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free


IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

 21 February 19

Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer,

Alexey Egorov

Software Engineer – Cognifield, LLC

Alexey Egorov holds a MS in Engineering and BS in Computer Science from The Ural University of Russia. Alexey is a senior level software engineer with over 25 years of programming experience. Alexey is currently working for Cognifield LLC. Alexey’s research interests include artificial intelligence development, machine learning, and natural language understanding.

Presentation on: Hybrid Intelligent Interface (Machine Learning)

Abstract: The Hybrid Intelligent Interface is a software system that bridges human and complex environments as a user-friendly interface for convenience and service. Ideal Human Computer Interfaces need a hybrid solution with ontology, natural language understanding, and machine learning tools. This work investigates how to combine understanding and learning in to a system of principles. Of course, each of these tasks has very high complexity, so we need to look for partial restricted solutions. Current solutions can reduce complexity so each subject area may accomplish function while adding user experience and a better understanding of what General AI is and what architecture it should have.  This presentation presupposes the existence of examples of concepts processed by Machine Learning methods and the ability to use them in ontology and related procedures.

Location: The University of Denver, Ritchie School of Engineering (RM 300).

Date is 21 Feb 2019 – 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm.

Invited: IEEE Members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free


IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

13 January 19 – Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer:

Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer,

James Gowans

Computer and Information Theory Society, Denver Chapter Chair – Electronics and Computer Engineer

James Gowans holds a MS in Electronics and Computer Engineering Technology from Indiana State University, a MS in Information Systems and Communications from the University of Denver, and several other graduate certificates in telecommunications, management, and quality systems. James is a senior member in the IEEE computer, information theory, communications society, as well as the U.S. National Committee (USNC) for the International Union of Radio Science (URSI). James current research interests include the synthesis of enterprise architecture, project systems development life cycle models, and quality systems improvement.

Presentation: Technical Presentations for Engineers

Abstract: We have been taught since childhood that should not speak up. We try to break our years of training but it is still hard to present or speak up in public. As presenters we speak with practice but at times we can loose ourselves to uncontrollable fight or flight emotion. However, we may all develop confidence at speaking then use our technical knowledge to become great speakers. Within this presentation, we will talk about our future presentation’s purpose, construction, organization, and the delivery. This presentation explains how to easily aurally and visually depict complex information in the simplest and most logical fashion. This presentation focuses on building future presenters as “audience centered speakers” and how to use presentation tools that engage, communicate, motivate, and direct the audience. Public speaking may be thought of as an art but there are skills that we may used to develop our presentations from the most basic to the award winning.

Location: The University of Denver, Ritchie School of Engineering (RM 410).

Date is 13 Jan 2019 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm.

Invited: IEEE Members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free



* Honors and Past Events – 2018 *



IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

14 December 18

Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer,

Dr. Rick Brownrigg

Software Engineer – National Center for Atmospheric Research

Rick Brownrigg holds a PhD, MS, and BS in Computer Science from The University of Kansas. Rick is a senior level software engineer with over 30 years of programming experience. Rick is currently working for National Center for Atmospheric Research and serving as the Denver IEEE Computer and Information Theory Secretary. Rick’s research interests include software development, scientific visualization and computer graphics.

Presentation: Webcomponents

Abstract: HTML, CSS and javascript are the foundational technologies for web development on the client side. However, developing modern, richly interactive and highly dynamic applications demands thinking in terms of higher-order concepts, such as UI widgets, behaviors, idioms, experiences, etc. Web Components are one approach to addressing this complexity. Web Components are a set of W3C specifications, rooted fundamentally in HTML, CSS, javascript, which are implemented directly by the browsers. We will identify the specific standards that comprise this technology and, from the perspective of Google’s Polymer library, show how these extensions work together to create custom tags. We will further illustrate the use of custom components in a small but non-trivial application. Finally, we will discuss the challenges to adopting Web Components.

Location: The University of Denver, Ritchie School of Engineering (RM 410).

Date is 14 Dec 2018 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm.

Invited: IEEE Members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free


IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

12 October 18

Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer,

 James Gowans

Computer and Information Theory Society, Denver Chapter Chair – Electronics and Computer Engineer

James Gowans holds a MS in Electronics and Computer Engineering Technology from Indiana State University, a MS in Information Systems and Communications from the University of Denver, and several other graduate certificates in telecommunications, management, and quality systems. James is a senior member in the IEEE Computer, Information Theory, and Communications Societies, as well as a member of the U.S. National Committee (USNC) for the International Union of Radio Science (URSI). James current research interests include the synthesis of enterprise architecture, project management, systems development life cycle models, and quality systems improvement.

Presentation: Engineering Process into Modern Simulation and Automation

Abstract: Engineering studies, ventures, and engineering processes have become simulated, emulated, and even developed in to an effort of automation. Such that, many engineering process can be automated using recorded data, logic, and the scientific methods no matter what the field. The Engineering Process into Modern Simulation and Automation presented a looked at development engineering techniques at the time when computers started to enter in to nominal engineering efforts and how computation continues to change our current engineering efforts. Moreover, how advancements have progressed in hardware and software toward powerful processes oriented human operations that are ripe for automation.

 Location: The University of Denver, Ritchie School of Engineering (RM 410).

Date is 12 Oct 2018 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm.

Invited: IEEE Members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free


IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

15 September 18

Denver IEEE Computer Society Distinguished Lecturer,

 Dr. Mark Paulk

University of Texas at Dallas – Computer Science Department

Dr. Mark Paulk teaches software engineering at the University of Texas at Dallas and is a consultant and author in software engineering, software process improvement, high maturity practices, agile methods, and statistical thinking.

Dr. Paulk was a Senior Systems Scientist at the Institute for Software Research at Carnegie Mellon University from 2002 to 2012, co-authoring the eSourcing Capability Model for Service Providers. From 1987 to 2002, Dr. Paulk was with the Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon, where he led the work on the Capability Maturity Model for Software. He was co-project editor of ISO/IEC 15504-2 (Software Process Assessment: Baseline Practices Guide), is a 2014-2017 member of the IEEE Software and Systems Engineering Standards Committee (S2ESC) Executive Committee, and is the 2016 Vice President of the Standards Activities Board for the IEEE Computer Society.

Dr. Paulk received his PhD in industrial engineering from the University of Pittsburgh, his MS in computer science from Vanderbilt University, and his BS in mathematics and computer science from the University of Alabama in Huntsville. He is a Fellow of the ASQ, a Certified ScrumMaster, and a Senior Member of the IEEE.

Presentation on:  Software Project Management

Abstract: This one-day morning seminar addresses the challenges, strategies, and tools for managing software projects. The seminar is structured according to the knowledge areas of the Project Management Body of Knowledge. Customer relationship management, decision making, earned value, critical path, critical chain, and agile methodologies will be discussed. Effective project management is a prerequisite for meeting commitments, yet all too many software projects fail to meet customer expectations for budget, schedule, functionality, and quality. Many customers now require their suppliers to demonstrate their commitment to process improvement and quality management by using, or being certified against, various models and standards. Project management is a fundamental requirement to achieve Level 2 against the Capability Maturity Integration (CMMI) for Development or to be certified against ISO 9001.

Location: The University of Denver, Ritchie School of Engineering (RM 410).

Date is 15 September 2018 (Saturday) 10:00 am to 12 pm.

Invited: IEEE Members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free


IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

12 July 18

Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer,

Tim Weil

Cybersecurity Editor for IEEE IT Professional magazine – Network Project Manager, Alcohol Monitoring Systems

Tim Weil is a Security Architect/IT Security Manager with over twenty five years of IT management, consulting, and engineering experience in the U.S. Government and Communications Industry. Tim’s technical areas of expertise includes FedRAMP/FISMA compliance for federal agencies and cloud service providers, IT service management, cloud security, enterprise risk management (NIST) for federal agencies, and ISO 27001 compliance for commercial clients. Tim is a Senior Member of the IEEE and Cybersecurity Editor for IEEE IT Professional magazine. Tim’s publications, blogs and speaking engagements are available from the website – http://securityfeeds.com.

Presentation: Cyberthreats and Security

Abstract: The landscape of cybersecurity continues to change rapidly, with new threats and attack paths that seemingly appear almost daily. At the same time, advances on the technology side have accelerated. In particular, the Internet of Things (IoT) and miniature cyber-physical systems are bringing information security concerns to every aspect of life, including clothing, kitchen appliances, and automobiles. The corporate world is also facing challenges in how to apply new technology such as the IoT and distributed ledger systems – technology that even many computer security professionals don’t fully understand. Tim’s presentation highlights the May/Jun 2018 special issue of IEEE IT Professional magazine on Cyberthreats and Security highlighting articles successfully addressing advances in data analytics, forensics, threat modeling, privacy engineering, cyber-resilience and biometrics.

Location: The University of Denver, Ritchie School of Engineering (RM 410).

Date is 12 Jul 2018 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm.

Invited: IEEE Members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free


IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

22 June 18

Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer, -and IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory presenter (Vail 2018)

 Dr. Manish Kumar Gupta

Dhirubhai Ambani Institute of Information and Communication Technology – Computer Science,  Mathematics, and Synthetic Biology

Dr. Manish Gupta teaches computer science, biological systems, and mathematics at the Dhirubhai Ambani Institute in Kanpur India.  Dr Gupta research interests include Information processing in biology, Coding and Information theory, Cryptology, DNA and Quantum computing, Computational, Structural and Systems Biology, Synthetic Biology, Bioinformatics.

Dr Manish K. Gupta received his PhD degree in Mathematics in 2000 from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India.Dr Gupta is teaching and researching at the Dhirubhai Ambani Institute as a senior professor. Previously, Dr Gupta has held various academic positions at the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand (2000-2002); National University of Singapore, Singapore (2001); Arizona State University, USA (2002-2004); The Ohio State University, USA (2004-2005); and Queens University, Canada (2005-2006). Since 2006. Additionally, Dr Gupta has lectured, published, researched, and professionally advised companies around the world. Dr Gupta is a senior member of the IEEE and a member of IEEE Computer and IEEE Information Theory Societies.

Presentation on:  The Art of DNA Strings: Data Storage

Abstract: This one-day morning seminar addresses the of science, capabilities, and mathematical technology  surrounding DNA data storage systems. The seminar presented coding theory, error correction, encryption, and data transfer to and from DNA computational and storage devices. Digital DNA based devices are cutting edge technology and are out of the hands of many in the consumer markets. However, larger companies and research institutes are racing forward with biological and computational technology. In our computational world storage has been a fundamental need and life has chosen DNA to store the blueprint of life in more complexity then our greatest engineering efforts. the integration of biologic template in to storage is becoming a basic computing primitive as it represents information in many differing formats and digital DNA has the ability to provide more size and capability than any current technology. Modern Humans are generating data every day from digital media such as cameras, the Internet, phones, sensors and there is a pressing need for a technology that can store this data in the dense storage medium. It is predicted that soon the data generated will be in the order of Geopbytes (10^30) from the Internet of Things. Synthetic data storage seems to be the right technology emerging on the horizon.

Location: The University of Denver, Ritchie School of Engineering (RM 410).

Date is 22 June 2018 (Friday) 6:30 pm to 9:00 pm.

Invited: IEEE Members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free


IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society – Technical Meeting

12 April 18

Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer,

 Dr. Amitabh Rakshit

Founder of PreAcute PHM, Inc – Founder & CEO

Ami Rakshit holds a PhD in Bioengineering from Texas A&M University and a Masters in Computer Science from University of Massachusetts. Dr. Rakshit is the Founder and President of “PreAcute PHM, Inc.” and has been involved as a researcher, entrepreneur, and leader in healthcare for over 35 years. Dr. Rakshit is currently interested and researching Population Health Management and Disease Modeling.

Presentation on: Computers in Modern Healthcare

Abstract: Computers in modern Health care services and applications are ever more important and dependent to our health care workers. In healthcare, medical analysis, computation, storage and transport systems are becoming more complex and detailed. Healthcare offices are becoming a system or healthcare data systems, and they are growing at a multiple exponential with every new technology development. Computers in Modern Healthcare provide a glimpse in to the need for chemical, healthcare service, delivery, research, education, and pharmacy to become more of an ingratiated health system, growing toward our new technologies. We will need strong ethics, complexity, innovation, and technology management to ensure we provide the best computer systems for our healthcare workers.

 Location: The University of Denver, Ritchie School of Engineering (RM 410).

Date is 12 April 2018 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm.

Invited: IEEE Members, guests, students, walk-ins are welcome.

Cost: Free



* Honors and Past Events – 2015 *



Past Presentation: Jun 2015 – Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer:

Joseph Webster

Presentation on: Encryption != Protection. A proposed framework for thinking about file security



* Honors and Past Events – 2014 *



Past Presentation Sep 2014 – Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer:

Chris Alaimo

Presentation on: Recent Trends in Cloud Computing


Past Presentation Feb 2014 – Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer:

Tim Weil

Presentation on: Rebooting the Denver COMSOC/CS Chapters: A Program for 2014



* Honors and Past Events – 2013 *



Past Presentation Oct 2013 – Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer:

Nathan Olech

Presentation on: Design of the PlanningMyMeals web site: using services and mashups to implement a comprehensive set of features


Past Presentation Sep 2013 – Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer:

Karl Neybert

Presentation on: Brainstorming: Getting and Using Creative Ideas


Past Presentation Jun 2013 – Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer:

Dr. Ted Bickart

Presentation on: The Voice of the Past – The Foundation of the Future (IEEE Global History Network (GHN))


Past Presentation May 2013 – Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer:

Dr. Lynn Carter

Presentation on: Demonstrating Competency


Past Presentation Mar 2013 – Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer:

Tim Weil

Presentation on: Software Defined Networking (SDN), Cloud API, IPv6 Forum, Smart Grid, Machine to Machine Networks


Past Presentation Feb 2013 – Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer:

Tim Weil and Pankaj Goyal

Presentation on: WordPress and Electronic Communication for IEEE Geo Units


Past Presentation Jan 2013 – Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer:

Tim Weil

Presentation on: Role Based Access Control



* Honors and Past Events – 2012 *



Past Presentation Dec 2012 – Denver IEEE Computer Society Guest Lecturer:

Pankaj Goyal

Presentation on: Cyber World Intrusion Tolerance