Nvidia presents a new processor for autonomous vehicles

NVIDIA has presented Parker, their new mobile processor to power the next generation of autonomous vehicles. Parker delivers up to 1.5 teraflops of performance for deep learning-based self-driving AI cockpit systems and offers the raw graphics performance and features to power multiple high-resolution displays, such as cockpit instrument displays and in-vehicle infotainment panels.

nvidia connected vehicles ieee

NVIDIA has presented at the Hot Chips conference in Cupertino, California, their new mobile processor to power the next generation of autonomous vehicles, named Parker. Parker has a CPU architecture consisting of two next-generation 64-bit Denver CPU cores (Denver 2.0) paired with four 64-bit ARM Cortex A57 CPUs. These all work together in a fully coherent heterogeneous multi-processor configuration to deliver up to 1.5 teraflops of performance for deep learning-based self-driving AI cockpit systems.

A new 256-core Pascal GPU in Parker delivers the performance needed to run advanced deep learning inference algorithms for self-driving capabilities. And it offers the raw graphics performance and features to power multiple high-resolution displays, such as cockpit instrument displays and in-vehicle infotainment panels.

Working in concert with Pascal-based supercomputers in the cloud, the company claims that Parker-based self-driving cars can be continually updated with newer algorithms and information to improve self-driving accuracy and safety.

To address the needs of the automotive market, Parker includes features such as a dual-CAN (controller area network) interface to connect to the numerous electronic control units in the modern car, and Gigabit Ethernet to transport audio and video streams. Compliance with ISO 26262 is achieved through a number of safety features implemented in hardware, such as a safety engine that includes a dedicated dual-lockstep processor for reliable fault detection and processing.

Parker is architected to support both decode and encode of video streams up to 4K resolution at 60 frames per second. This will enable automakers to use higher resolution in-vehicle cameras for accurate object detection, and 4K display panels to enhance in-vehicle entertainment experiences.

 


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